Hose Reels - Expert Commentary

Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants
Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants

There is a sense in some markets that the paper and pulp industry will decline owing to the digital technologies with which people interact every day. While this might be considered logical, the reality is completely different. In fact, the paper and pulp industry has experienced a steady growth and will continue to do so in 2021. Production of paper increased by more than 450% in the last decades and the demand of paperboard in the world is expected to grow significantly, driven by e-commerce and big retailers increasing their presence in the online sales universe. This sustained growth in production capacity and paper consumption presents several fire risks to companies and exposes communities that develop around paper mills, to the impact of disasters caused by these fire risks. Fire risks in the paper and pulp industry Paper and cardboard are combustible, but this is not the only fire risk found in these types of industries. Raw materials and finished goods storage are sensitive to fire. In addition, the paper making process includes several stages where fires can occur, due to hot surfaces or poor ventilation. The most relevant fire risks on a paper plant are: Storage Areas: As mentioned before, paper and cardboard are combustible. Solid paper blocks and reels have hard surfaces that don’t ignite easily, but usually these reels can suffer minor damages or have loose sheets that significantly increase the fire risk. When paper reels are stacked in columns, gaps in the center can act as chimneys and when fires start in the bottom of the stack, this chimney effect will accelerate smoke and hot air spread, increasing vertical and horizontal flame spread. Wood and Bale storage fire risks Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present Raw materials for the paper making process can have two main sources, forestry products (mainly wood) or recycled cardboard and paper. Wood storage presents several challenges, especially due to wood chips that are highly combustible and, in some cases, even explosive. Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present. Fire in baled paper is difficult to extinguish and generates heavy smoke. In many recycling facilities, these paper bales are stored outdoors, where paper or rags soaked in flammable liquids, embedded between the paper sheets, can ignite resulting in a fast spreading fire. Chemicals, flammable liquids and gases In addition, it is possible to find different types of chemicals, flammable liquids and gases that are used in the paper making process. These materials have their own fire-related risks that need to be taken in consideration. Production Areas: In pulp factories, there are several long-distance conveyors that transport wood and wood chips. These conveyors constitute a fire risk and the most probable causes of fire are bearing damage, overheating of the conveyor and igniting chips in the environment. IR dryers, a common source of fire After the wood has been transported, chipped and digested, the paper making process becomes extremely humid, due to the large amounts of hot water and steam needed. But, as soon as the pulp fiber sheet starts to dry, the hot surfaces in contact with the paper sheets can be a source of ignition. IR dryers used in the process are also a common source of fire in the paper industry. When the sheet of paper is formed, close contact with reels and bearings moving fast can create static electricity that could ignite loose paper or airborne particles. Problems like these are likely to be more extensive in tissue mills. Paper dust is generated in certain parts of the process, especially where paper shits are slit or cut. Poorly insulated steam pipes lead to fire Poorly insulated steam pipes can ignite paper dust or even their own insulation materials. In addition, paper dust gathers in the ventilation grills of machinery, causing overheating and igniting as well. Heated oil is used in several parts of the process as well and if a malfunction occurs on the Hot Oil Roll systems, leaks might occur, exposing hot surfaces to this oil and causing ignitions. A paper mill has hydraulically operated machinery, where leaks or sprays might ignite as well. Service Areas: As in many other manufacturing facilities, several service areas can be found. Electrical and network equipment rooms have an inherent fire risk due to damaged wires or equipment, overheating or short circuits in high voltage circuits. Transformer and generator areas entail fire risks as well. High fire risk for boiler rooms Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves Hot water and steam are key components for the paper making process. For this reason, paper plants use high capacity boilers that can be powered by flammable liquids or gases. A high fire risk can be considered for boiler rooms. Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves. In addition to the fire risks mentioned in these areas, many maintenance operations can also pose fire risk, especially when hot works are being performed. Sparks caused by welding or the use of certain tools can ignite paper sheets or dust in the air. Poor housekeeping and buildup of paper dust, for example, increases the risk associated with maintenance and construction works. Prevention, the first line of defense According to the Health and Safety Executive from the United Kingdom, 60% of fires on paper mills are caused by machine faults and poor housekeeping. The first line of defense to avoid fire risks in paper plants is prevention. As mentioned before, a high number of fires in these types of facilities occur because of poor housekeeping and machine malfunction. The key is to identify the risks and possible ignition sources, and apply measures to minimize them. As in many industries, fire protection has two main components: Passive and Active protection. Passive fire protection measures Passive measures include fire rated walls, ceilings, and floors in the most critical areas. Chemical storage areas should be physically separated from other dangerous areas, if this is not possible then the walls separating areas should be fire rated and materials must be stored in a way that minimizes the risk of fire spread by radiation or conduction. Proper compartmentalization and intumescent protection of structural elements should be part of the package as well. Passive measures include proper ventilation and smoke control. As mentioned before, paper dust is a major fire risk, which is why ventilation and cleaning of hoods over the paper machine is important to minimize the possibility of ignition. Fire resisting construction should be designed with the following goals in mind: Protection of escape routes Form compartments to contain fires that might occur Separate areas of higher fire risk Protect load bearing and structural members to minimize risk of collapse Sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades. Finished goods stored indoors should be protected with sprinkler systems and the same should be considered for chemical storage areas and certain raw materials. Paper bales, ideally should be protected by sprinklers that are suitably designed to cope with the height and located, in all cases, 3 meters above the level of bales stacked vertically (which should not exceed 5 meters height). Spark detectors in hoods, pipes and ventilation systems Dangerous sparks could be generated in several parts of the paper making process, which is why spark detectors must be installed in hoods, pipes, and ventilation systems. Water spray and CO2 systems can be used to protect machinery against these risks. Means to fight fires, like extinguishers and hose reels, should be provided to support fire brigades. All the elements should be properly identified and all personnel should be trained and made aware of the location of such devices. Importance of fire alarms Fire alarms are required in all paper mills and fire alarm call points should be provided in all locations, according to international guidelines, such as NFPA 72 or EN54. The spread of flames and smoke in paper, wood and chemical storage might become extremely fast. For this reason, early detection is critical. Many technologies might be applied in the different areas of a paper plant. Nevertheless, there are dusty or humid areas where regular heat or smoke detectors might fail under certain circumstances. For these areas, especially located outdoors, innovative state-of-the-art detection solutions might be applied, like Video Fire Detection (VFD). NFPA 72 standard for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection, opening interesting alternatives for designers and fire protection engineers. Many EHS managers and fire protection professionals selected VFD, because it is the only fire detection solution that effectively covered their needs. Many engineers, specialized in fire protection for paper plants, explained that they tested linear heat detection, aspiration smoke detection, IR/UV detectors and even beams, but none of these technologies performed as they needed on the dirtiest or more humid areas. Video Fire Detection (VFD) solutions Outdoor storage areas are often unprotected, because deploying flame or heat detection in large open areas can be costly and mostly ineffective. VFD solutions can detect smoke and flames in outdoor conditions, allowing the monitoring and protection of wood and paper bales in large areas. Fire detection and alarm systems should be designed with the following goals: Minimize risk of fires, including the use of fire detection technology in areas where regular detection technologies cannot be implemented or are not practical. Minimize risk of flame and smoke spread, with state-of-the-art detection algorithms that guarantee fast and effective detection. Also, reliable algorithms minimize the possibility of nuance or unwanted alarms. In case of a fire, fast detection gives occupants life-saving time to reach to a place of safety, before the flames and smoke have spread to dangerous levels. Global production of paper and pulp reached 490 million tons in 2020, with many industries and markets depended on the paper and pulp supply chain. That is why innovative ways to protect this supply chain, are key to sustain the paper market growth in the future.

Optimize Your Firefighter Training Program
Optimize Your Firefighter Training Program

Want to know an easy way to judge the quality of a fire department? Look at how much they train. Career, volunteer or combination, fire departments become successful through training. Yet all training is not equal. Focus too much on hands-on training (HOT) and you could be missing important legal and compliance updates. Lean heavily on web-based training and you may fail to identify shortcomings in skills proficiencies. Keep students confined to a classroom and you may lose their interest quickly. Not surprisingly, a balance of all three types of training is needed to produce competent, empowered firefighters. For this article, I was challenged to think about what’s missing from our current fire training programs. As I thought about the varied way we approach fire training, three issues jumped out at me. Base training on facts and statistics Take advantage of new technologies Incorporate policy into your training   Your training program should also be strong in the types of calls you respond to most Base Training On Facts And Statistics If your department has a robust training program, outlined by a calendar of various topics and employing a mix of HOT, online and classroom training, you’re ahead of the curve. But even in departments with well-developed training programs, training is often based on preference or habit, not data. Think about the topics in your training program. Do you know why they’re included? Do they match your call make-up? Are they targeting specific skill shortcomings? (And yes, we all have them!)What’s missing from many fire department training programs is a detailed needs assessment What’s missing from many fire department training programs is a detailed needs assessment that in turn establishes a factual basis for the year’s training topics. The needs assessment should include: Surveying the members to determine the types of training they want or feel they need. Measuring firefighter proficiency on basic tasks, such as NFPA 1403 drills, NFPA 1710 drills and EMS patient assessment skills audits, to assess personnel by mandate or by industry best practice. This will identify skills deficiencies to address through training. Incorporating call volume statistics and details. A significant percentage of the calls fire departments respond to are EMS and vehicle extrication But I’d venture to guess the training programs of most departments don’t match those percentages. Yes, you need to train for the high-risk, low-frequency tasks. But your training program should also be strong in the types of calls you respond to most. Incorporating these “facts and stats” into your training program will help you keep it fresh, relevant and interesting. Firefighters can use their phones and tablets to access department training information and complete training assignments Take Advantage Of New Technologies There is something to be said for back-to-the-basics, keep-it-simple firefighter training. But it’s a mistake to ignore technological advances. From teaching safe apparatus backing procedures to practicing hoseline deployment and Vent/Enter/Isolate/Search (VEIS) tactics, instructors have more options than ever before. Some instructors regard simulators as second-rate to “the real thing.” Certainly, simulation and other forms of technology-driven instruction can’t replace the value of hands-on experience. But they can augment it in important ways. Driver simulators, for example, not only save money because apparatus don’t have to be taken out of service or sustain wear and tear; they also provide an environment where firefighters can learn without risk of injury. If sitting behind a computer isn’t your kind of thing, live-burn simulators, vehicle fire simulators and hazmat simulators are available—and they all significantly boost training efficiency.Technology will never replace hands-on instruction, but it can facilitate it But you don’t need fancy simulators to incorporate technology into your fire training program. Learning management systems (LMS) are another important tool that can increase training program efficiency. Although they’ve been around for a long time, LMS continue to improve. The ability to integrate with mobile devices is huge, allowing firefighters to use their phones and tablets to access department training information and complete training assignments. Leveraging this technology can allow you to more efficiently manage information, schedule training and free up valuable time needed for other important tasks. If you’ve attended some of the larger regional or national fire conferences recently, you may have had the opportunity to see audience response technology in action. By capturing the firefighters’ responses to questions in real-time, instructors can adjust the material to reflect students’ knowledge level. Audience response is also simply a great way to keep firefighters engaged. Technology will never replace hands-on instruction, but it can facilitate it. If you’re using training methods that haven’t changed in decades, something’s missing from your training program.   Without incorporating policy into your training, you’re only giving your firefighters half the equation Incorporate Policy Into Your Training I saved the biggest and best for last. When I work with fire departments across the country, I repeatedly discover the failure to incorporate policy into training. Think about it: Training curricula are almost always designed around procedures—the how of doing something. But isn’t the why just as important? And that’s what policy is all about. Without incorporating policy into your training, you’re only giving your firefighters half the equation.Inevitably firefighters will encounter times when following the procedure isn’t possible Inevitably firefighters will encounter times when following the procedure isn’t possible. That’s when policy training kicks in—firefighters understand the fundamental objective, and they can think on their feet about how to achieve it. Training on policy also helps departments address the issues that so often get firefighters into trouble. How many of your firefighters really understand your department’s social media policy? What about the rules surrounding sick time usage? These are things that trip up firefighters time and time again. If you’re not training on policies, it’s unlikely firefighters remember them. How many of your firefighters really understand your department’s social media policy? In addition, normalization of deviance is a risk to every organization. When personnel fail to follow policies and no negative repercussions result, it can quickly establish a new normal. Policy-based training resets the “normal” and makes sure that members of the organization comply with the policy and not what they think the policy says.Most line-of-duty death reports cite failure to comply with policy or lack of adequate policy Fire instructors often avoid training on policy because they regard it as boring or unrelated to what really matters—firefighter safety and survival. Yet most line-of-duty death reports cite failure to comply with policy or lack of adequate policy as contributing factors in the incident. If you’re worried that policy will make your training program dry and uninteresting, link it to real-world events. An online search provides lots of examples of when things went wrong and how adherence to policy might have produced a different outcome. And limit policy training to small chunks. Take out a 10-page policy and go through it line by line, and your students’ eyes will glaze over in seconds. Instead, look for ways to enrich your current training by bringing relevant pieces of policy into it. Your firefighters will be learning the department’s policies without even realizing it! Focus On Continuous Improvement Fire chiefs and fire instructors have a challenging job. Budgets are tight, and training is often one of the first things to be cut. Yet we need firefighters to be proficient in all-hazards response. Every department has a long training wish list. But if we focus on continuous quality improvement, we can get a little better each year. Looking for opportunities to incorporate statistics, technology and policy into our training is a good place to start.

Latest Rosenbauer International AG news

Rosenbauer Brandschutz Deutschland Relocates To New Address
Rosenbauer Brandschutz Deutschland Relocates To New Address

  In order to create more office space and to make warehousing and logistics more efficient, Rosenbauer Brandschutz Deutschland moved two streets down to Krugbäckerstrasse from its old location in Mogendorf at the end of 2020. With a floor space of almost 2,000m2, the new office space is not only significantly larger, but also brighter and more modern. The warehouse has also been incorporated into the new location. This means that construction sites can be supplied with material more efficiently in the future. new office building In addition, the material flow has been realigned, and the layout of the two halls redesigned. "We practically planned all of the logistics from scratch, and took the opportunity to carry out structural optimization and adjust the production processes where possible," says Andreas Steindl, Head of Central Technics.With the move to the new office building and the redesign of the logistics, another step into the future has been taken. Thanks to the huge commitment of the employees, all of this could be achieved in record time.Rosenbauer Brandschutz Deutschland GmbH can now be found at the following address:Krugbäckerstrasse 356424 MogendorfGermanyPhone: +49 2623-9642-0

Rosenbauer Österreich Opens New Customer Center In Asten
Rosenbauer Österreich Opens New Customer Center In Asten

  Rosenbauer is continuing to expand its operations in Upper Austria. The international fire equipment provider, which has its corporate headquarters in Leonding, Austria, is setting up a new point of contact for its customers in Asten. The Rosenbauer Österreich Customer Center will offer fire services for everything they need for operations. There, they will be able to have all their technology, vehicles, pumps, and equipment inspected and serviced, procure spare parts and buy a new kit. The location, which is already home to a logistics center, is the fourth in Austria after Leonding 1 and 2, the two production facilities for vehicles and extinguishing systems, and Linz-Pichling, where fire helmets are made. Its opening underlines the company's commitment to the region. More space for servicing Fire trucks will be maintained and repaired in a purpose-built workshop with twelve service bays. That is five more than Leonding, where servicing will cease once the Asten site is up and running and the space that this frees up will be used for production. The servicing infrastructure at the new location includes state-of-the-art test equipment for firefighting pumps and foam proportioning systems, a cable winch test rig, a washing station, and a preservation unit applying for underbody protection. Vehicle service bays are fitted with efficient exhaust extraction systems The vehicle service bays are fitted with efficient exhaust extraction systems, while the extinguishing agent test stations have a dedicated tank for collecting foam concentrate. The preservation unit features an automated air purification system with high-performance filters. An assembly area with metal machining equipment and a welding station is also being set up in the workshop so that minor modifications and refurbishment, modernization, and general overhaul work can be carried out on fire trucks. "We want to keep on growing in our Customer Service business unit and broaden our range," says Andreas Zeller, Chief Sales Officer at Rosenbauer. "We see a lot of potential in the refurbishment in particular and are setting our sights on more than just domestic fire services – more than that, we want Asten to be a base for an international operation." New one-stop-shop Alongside the servicing infrastructure, Rosenbauer will be offering fire services a full range of spare parts and equipment at its customer center in Asten. The new shop will have much more floor space than was previously available in Leonding and will offer all key products for fire services, particularly own-brand personal protective equipment and technical safety gear. This includes HEROS firefighting helmets, FIRE FLEX protective suit, Rosenbauer nozzles, and the NAUTILUS range of submersible pumps. Experienced expert consultants will be on hand to help fire services choose the right equipment, and the key products will also be available online in the near future. "We want to be easily accessible to fire services, and close links with our customers are very important to us," says Markus Wieshofer, Managing Director of Rosenbauer Österreich. "They can visit us at our new shop in Asten, order equipment conveniently online, or put in requests through our mobile equipment shop. Then, we'll take a bus full of products directly to the fire house and provide an on-site consulting service."The Rosenbauer Österreich Customer Center will be open to fire services starting in April. The shop is due to open on April 12, followed by the service department a month later on May 10. Thanks to its convenient location near the Asten exit, the new Rosenbauer customer center is easily accessible via the West Autobahn freeway.

Rosenbauer Designed Four New Detection And Decontamination Vehicles As Per The Chinese Emergency Management Fire Rescue Bureau Demands
Rosenbauer Designed Four New Detection And Decontamination Vehicles As Per The Chinese Emergency Management Fire Rescue Bureau Demands

Designed and implemented precisely to the customer's wishes and equipped with an extensive range of state-of-the-art equipment: The four new unique detection and decontamination vehicles for the Emergency Management Fire Rescue Bureau meet the highest demands. The requirements that the Chinese Emergency Management Fire Rescue Bureau outlined for the new detection and decontamination vehicles were very high. And thus, they posed a welcome challenge for Rosenbauer's experienced technicians, who developed and then implemented the corresponding vehicle concept. Because, with the exception of the MAN TGS chassis with its 480 hp engine, the concept on which the four new vehicles are based is a completely new development. The combination of high-end detection, command function, and extensive personnel self-autonomy, as well as a high-pressure decontamination unit, has never before been implemented in a single-vehicle. Analysis of gases at a distance of 5 km Several state-of-the-art detection devices have been installed in the vehicles: One such piece of apparatus is a high-quality gas detector that uses spectral analysis to detect, analyze, and locate a wide variety of gases at a distance of up to five kilometers using GPS and maps. If necessary, this can easily be extended over the upper edge of the roof at the push of a button, while in its retracted position it is protected within the superstructure. A detector for nuclear gamma radiation and numerous other mobile analysis devices are also installed. Command and analysis room features seating with integrated breathing apparatus holders provided Another special feature is the so-called glove box: In this container, which is housed in the command and analysis room in the front third of the vehicle, hazardous substances can be analyzed in a sealed environment. Thanks to an artificially generated vacuum and an in-house-developed filter system, no hazardous substances are able to escape. The command and analysis room features comfortable workplaces for two people, with seating with integrated breathing apparatus holders provided for an additional three people. All control units for the equipment are clearly arranged on a large control console, with the majority also being able to be controlled via remote control. Weather station, cameras, and light mast Thanks to a pneumatically extendable weather station, the crew is not only able to see the weather conditions at all times, but can also simulate the potential spread of a cloud of hazardous substances if necessary. Also, due to the extendable, rotatable, and swiveling camera system with zoom function, operation sites can be observed from a safe distance. If required, the camera images can be transmitted to the 55" screen in the command and analysis room or to a laptop - as can all other relevant information. Thanks to Wi-Fi and other transmission capabilities, the images can also be made accessible to other vehicles or the control center. By utilizing the Birdview technology, the crew can view their own vehicle and its immediate surroundings from a bird's eye view. A pneumatically extendable LED light mast and well-designed vehicle illumination ensure appropriate lighting for night-time operations. Decontamination of people and materials A shower cubicle for decontaminating people who have come into contact with dangerous goods is situated in the middle of the superstructure. The water comes from a 1000-liter fresh water tank and is treated with UV light before use, thus killing any germs. Water heating and chemical admixing round off the automated shower facility's water supply system. The resulting wastewater is collected in a separate 600-liter tank. The entire water treatment system is also designed for use with an isolated shower tent. A high-pressure decontamination unit and accessories are also installed in the rear of the vehicle A high-pressure decontamination unit and accessories are also installed in the rear of the vehicle. This means that equipment can be largely decontaminated and cleaned in-situ when needed. Depending on the hazard type, various decontamination agents can be added via a separate proportioning system. If necessary, the high-pressure unit can also be used to generate steam. The 60-meter hose reel ensures a large movement radius for decontamination work. Self-decontamination of the vehicles But that's not all: The four detection and decontamination vehicles can also decontaminate themselves. Separate lines are attached to the roof of the superstructure and driver's cab, which allow the vehicle to clean itself if required. The safety of the crew itself is also ensured by the vehicle's equipment: a central breathing air supply system allows up to five people to breathe pure, clean air in the event of an emergency. It is fed by three compressed air bottles, the volume of which is sufficient for at least one hour at maximum consumption. The equipment compartments provide sufficient space for protective clothing and other equipment needed to analyze hazardous goods and for decontamination. Pneumatically retractable stairs, an extremely quiet diesel-powered generator in the rear, retractable awnings on both sides, air conditioning, auxiliary heating, and a jacking system for perfect positioning of the vehicle: these are just a few more equipment highlights of the four new detection and decontamination vehicles for the Emergency Management Fire Rescue Bureau in China, which will provide valuable service in emergency operations. Speaking of operations: the four vehicles have already been delivered to China, and the teams are currently receiving intensive training on how they are operated. They are then stationed at central logistics bases in four provinces and will offer quick and efficient support for challenging missions in the event of an emergency. Because that's exactly what they have been developed and built for.

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