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Introducing A New Way Of Software Development At Rosenbauer
Introducing A New Way Of Software Development At Rosenbauer

During the latest redesign of the Rosenbauer Rescue Stairs not only the operation has been overhauled, but the CAN bus system has also been implemented from scratch. A reduction of Electronic Control Units (ECUs) was achieved by using controllers from TTControl which are certified for safety purposes. The risk and hazard analysis showed that there are safety requirements up to performance level d, as defined in ISO 13849. Simplified Architecture Based On Safety Certified Electronics With the new architecture, Rosenbauer achieved to put all safety features in one single TTControl ECU, which features the redundancy internally. Safety requirements like tilting and leveling are programmed by two independent developer teams, one team at TTControl in Brixen and another team at Rosenbauer in Leonding. On the ECU the multitasking real-time system SAFERTOS® is operating both developed algorithms in parallel. The safety algorithm stops the Rescue stair all at once. The application algorithm takes care that the machine never moves to a position where the safety algorithm would need to take control and warns the user in advance on the display. TTControl ECU combined with the SAFERTOS® guarantees the freedom of interference As the TTControl ECU combined with the SAFERTOS® guarantees the freedom of interference, the non-safety relevant application software can be maintained and deployed on the same controller without the need to repeat all the safety certification on every new software version. As the products are varying greatly based on the final customer, this is an important feature to reduce the maintenance efforts of the complete software. Reduction of ECUs With this safety architecture, Rosenbauer achieved a reduction of ECUs from six units of three different types to three units of identical type. Another reduction of electronics was performed on the hydraulic valves. The previous generation featured a valve manifold, where each valve had a small electronics module integrated, which was controlled via an individual PWM signal. Now the complexity of the system was reduced by eliminating the electronics on the valves and using two outputs for each valve instead. The TTControl ECUs have everything on board for this purpose. They have sufficient outputs and each PWM output is capable of measuring its current. The accuracy of the current measurement is sufficient for moving the valve in every position via current control without a sensor on the valve. Only actuators with position control are equipped with sensors, while all-speed control is performed without sensors. Software Development On A Virtual Model In this project pioneering work was done in the way of application software development at Rosenbauer. A virtual model was created for the whole hydraulic system, with two PWM signals for each actuator as an input. All sensor signals were measured on the real system, and used as outputs like hydraulic pressures, end positions of the actuators, CAN signals, and current values. This model was used in two ways: On one hand, it was deployed by automatic code generation onto another TTControl ECUs to enable the safety software development team to perform software tests without traveling to the rescue stairs. All relevant characteristics of the 33 ton and about 1million EURO rescue stairs were put in one controller. The software development started on the desk as well, but nobody knew how it would behave on the machine On the other hand, the model was used to develop the application software. Therefore, the hardcoded current and position controllers from TTControl were imported into Simulink. In this way, externally delivered code pieces and the model of the mechanics were operating in one PC simulation, independent of the production status of the machine and with no hardware at all. Testing on the machine Before this model-based approach, the software development started on the desk as well, but nobody knew how it would behave on the machine. The real work started at the point of time when the programmer sat in the machine. With the new method, the programmer knows that the application software is functional and must search the differences or the missing test case during the commissioning only. It turned out that everything working in the simulation also worked in real life, as the tricky part of finding correct resting positions and keeping the first and last stair of the mainframe telescope in a flat position. Efficient Software Testing From Office With the simulation, the development iterations can be driven to a maximum and the programmer gets off all the external influences. A machine of this size can be run only outside, so the programmer is exposed to the weather and to the noise of the diesel engine. For each iteration, the software needs to be downloaded to the controller, and interesting variables must be monitored and plotted for each iteration. In practice, the days get longer and are extremely stressful, as it usually takes very long until all IO checks and mechanical and electrical installations are 100 % finished. The delivery date never changes, but all the other processes take longer as planned, which must be compensated by the extra working hours of the programmer. With the simulation, the software development and testing can be done efficiently in the office, decoupled from noise, stress, and bad weather conditions. The quality and the possibility of maintenance of the generated software are much better this way. Software design The embedded code generator gives the programmer the possibility to concentrate on the software design At the software development itself, MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow and the embedded code generator give the programmer the possibility to concentrate on the software design. The hard work of writing the code after drawing the Stateflow diagram is automated by the code generator. Even if it turns out during the commissioning that there was a wrong assumption in the model, adding an extra state or transition is only a matter of drawing and has no big impact on software that is already programmed. Another advantage of the model-based design is that the drawings of the software can be understood by the customer service and other stakeholders, who are no programmers. The self-speaking drawings in Simulink/Stateflow can be exported to HTML and published to everyone as in-depth documentation of the software.

Rosenbauer Shares Refurbishment Services For A Legendary Vehicle Concept
Rosenbauer Shares Refurbishment Services For A Legendary Vehicle Concept

There are often vehicles in a fire department’s fleet that are highly specialized and unique. Firefighters have fond memories of these vehicles and cherish the missions on which the devices provided critical assistance. The volunteer fire department in Windischgarsten, Upper Austria, has one such unique small firefighting vehicle in service. It is built on a very special chassis – a Pinzgauer – from Austria. New Or Old Vehicle Since a replacement for the Pinzgauer was scheduled, the fire department members thought about the tasks that needed to be fulfilled by this vehicle. Ultimately, they decided that repairs and modernization would be sensible in order to extend the life of their Pinzgauer. Rosenbauer enjoyed contributing the experience and skills to the realization of a one-of-a-kind firefighting vehicle Two and a half years ago, Rosenbauer was contacted by the Windischgarsten volunteer fire department through Rosenbauer-Service and invited to an inspection meeting, which they were of course very glad to attend. The fire department wanted to completely refurbish their Pinzgauer. Any corrosion had to be removed from the body and chassis, and lighting equipment had to be renovated or enhanced in order to improve the safety of the emergency services and to facilitate the tasks at the scene of an emergency. The signal system needed to be brought up to date and the necessary equipment renewed and installed so that the intended operational tasks could still be managed by the fire truck. The Perfect Partner After discussions and brainstorming with the fire department, the offer was finalized. In spring 2021, the time had come: after the chassis had been overhauled by a specialist company, the vehicle arrived at Rosenbauer and got down to work. New shutters, roof boxes, equipment compartment devices, LED lighting both in and around the vehicle, new cabling, and supply facilities; all of this was implemented according to the wishes of the customer and fully utilizing our vast experience. Eventually, Rosenbauer was able to hand over an appreciable vehicle to the Windischgarsten fire department, which will once again meet the operational requirements for years to come. Rosenbauer thoroughly enjoyed contributing the experience and skills to the realization of a one-of-a-kind firefighting vehicle.

Rosenbauer’s ARFF Flagship The Panther Safeguards The USA’s No.1 Airport
Rosenbauer’s ARFF Flagship The Panther Safeguards The USA’s No.1 Airport

“It doesn’t matter if you’re underway to heaven or hell, you’ll still have to change in Atlanta!” No other saying expresses better the function of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Georgia’s capital city. The airport is geographically located, that allows 80 % of the US population reachable within two hours flying time, Atlanta is the most important transfer airport in the USA: 89 % of all flights to/from Atlanta are internal and 152 of the192 gates are reserved for this purpose. At peak times, there are over 200 flights per hour and in 2019, Atlanta handled a total of 904,3011 aircraft movements. Since 1998, the US hub leads the international passenger volume statistics. With the exception of the corona year 2020, as from 2015, the airport has handled more than a hundred million passengers annually. Atlanta is, therefore, the world’s busiest airport. Only the best for the biggest The PANTHER has proven to be absolutely reliable in tough daily operations In 2019, Atlanta, Peking, Los Angeles, Dubai, and Tokyo represented the ranking sequence of the world’s largest airports in terms of passenger volume and they all have one thing in common. As far as the “front line” of their ARFFs is concerned, they all rely on Rosenbauer’s flagship vehicle, the PANTHER. For example, the Airport Battalion of the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department has had six PANTHERs in service for the past two years, which have long passed their baptism of fire and proven to be absolutely reliable in tough daily operations. As a consequence, the Airport has ordered another three PANTHERs with the result that from next year onwards its ARFF vehicle fleet will consist entirely of Rosenbauer ARFF vehicles. Versatility of the series Orlando, Miami, Houston, Nashville, and Fort Lauderdale are other large US airports that operate PANTHERs in their fleet, including the United States Air Force, United States Army, and the United States Coast Guard. The versatility of the series plays a decisive role in this connection, as for example the vehicles on 4x4 and 6x6 chassis can be delivered as compact versions suitable for air transport. In turn, the larger trucks with 6x6 and 8x8 chassis can be fitted with the Rosenbauer STINGER extinguishing arm and thus be augmented to form genuine quints. The extinguishing arm can be extended to 16.5m (20m as an option) and apart from a water/foam turret also carries a piercing tool for remote interior attacks utilizing penetration through the outer hull of the aircraft. Performance that pays What makes the PANTHER particularly special is the perfect integration of its chassis, superstructure and extinguishing technology systems, which not only creates maximum driving dynamics and extinguishing performance, but also safety and reliability. When sprinting across an airport, the truck attains maximum speeds of up to 135 km/h and the uncompromising all-wheel-drive system with rigid axles and coil springs gives a smooth ride even over rough ground. With a firefighting system output of up to 10,000 l/min, the extinguishing agent payload can be depleted in less than 120 seconds. The vehicle’s water/foam turrets have a range of up to 100 m and during pump & roll operation, the turrets and self-protection devices can be activated during the response. Depending upon the axle configuration, (4x4, 6x6, or 8x8), a PANTHER carries between 7,000 and 19,000 l of extinguishing agents to the emergency scene. Moreover, the diversity of the extinguishing agents on board, means that fire services can successfully deal with any fire, irrespective of whether this involves burning kerosene, aluminum, or composite materials, etc. Everything for safety PANTHER can be equipped with a 360-degree Birdseye view camera, which gives the operator an overhead view When responding to an alarm, the PANTHER crew is ideally protected in its crash-tested and ECE R29-3 certificated cabin. A high-strength X-frame also forms a safety cage around the occupants.  Optimum panorama vision is provided by generous glass areas in the cab and sufficient light is furnished by powerful halogen searchlights and scene lights, plus an integrated LED warning light system. In addition, the PANTHER can be equipped with a 360-degree Birdseye view camera, which gives the operator an overhead view of the area around the vehicle, and a FLIR camera for infrared images in poor visibility. As options, an Electronic Stability Control system (ESC) is available for enhanced driving safety along with a tire pressure monitoring system. The PANTHER also carries a type of black box, like that used in aircraft, which supplies a permanent flow of data about the vehicle that covers its speed, lateral, longitudinal, and vertical acceleration, the position of the accelerator pedal, the steering wheel angle, activation of the brake pedal, vehicle tilt and the operational duration and location. Airport Battalion Atlanta The Airport Battalion at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is one of the seven units belonging to the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department. This is a professional fire service with around 1,100 employees, which has responsibility for the entire city area including the airport. The assignments of the Battalion not only include firefighting in the case of an aircraft accident, but also mobile and stationary fire protection in buildings and emergency medical services. On the 1,922 ha airport site, it operates five firehouses consisting of Station 24 on the taxiway to the two northern runways (26R + 26L), Station 32 in the terminal area (without ARFF vehicles), Stations 33 and 40 for the two southern runways (27R + 27L) and Station 35 in the cargo zone.

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