Extinguishers - Expert Commentary

Maintaining Fire Safety Through A Pandemic
Maintaining Fire Safety Through A Pandemic

There have been challenges with completing fire safety maintenance and installation projects during the current Covid-19 crisis, most notably as a result of the difficulties for installers in safely accessing sites. Many construction projects halted for lockdown and this resulted in approximately 50% of the British installers we work with having to furlough staff. The challenges, however, are not just restricted to the UK. With Kentec panels sold in more than 90 countries across the world, we have seen varying challenges on a global scale. Throughout this crisis, fire safety continues to be paramount and as such key players, such as Kentec, are rightly considered essential businesses. We have continued manufacturing life safety systems throughout the current difficulties and it has been our mission to ensure that where new installations can take place, our panels are readily available to installers, as well as the expertise and technical support that goes with it for ongoing maintenance. Orders for spare parts have also, in fact, been consistently high during this period, as installers have been able to complete minor upgrades safely and end users have taken advantage of the period to do so. Adapting manufacturing processes to align with government guidelines so that customers have not experienced any supply issues with any life safety systems or parts has been a major success. Critical Infrastructure We’ve personally seen an increase in sales for our industry-leading Sigma XT extinguishant panels during this crisis as it is widely used within critical infrastructure, in sectors such as telecommunications, data centres and healthcare. Adapting manufacturing processes to align with government guidelines has been a major success During lockdown, with a vast proportion of the population working from home and relying on the internet to conduct their business and virtual meetings, it has been more important than ever that there is no loss in service in broadband and telephone services. This means that highly reliable and robust fire extinguishing systems are essential to protect essential workers and vital equipment – not only from the risk of fire, but also from the catastrophic damage that false alarms and the release of extinguishant could have, for example, on server room equipment. Understandably, this has resulted in considerable investment in fire systems in these sectors. Glasgow’s Louisa Jordan NHS Facility The recent fire safety installation at the Louisa Jordan NHS Facility Glasgow – located at the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) which provides more than 500 COVID-19 beds – is just one example of essential fire safety work being completed during lockdown. Vipond Fire Protection Ltd installed a total of seven Sigma XT gas suppression panels, and 32 detectors located within the electrical room that serves the 10,000m2 facility. The project was completed in what was an extremely tight seven-day turnaround, delivering proven reliability within a crucial healthcare facility. Kentec's Experience Operating Through Covid-19 We have learned that operating through this crisis and supporting installations that are going ahead is best achieved through detailed planning, communication and collaboration. For example, we’re supporting our distributors by shipping directly to their customers, when it is not safe or feasible to open their warehouses. Operating through this crisis is best achieved through detailed planning, communication and collaboration Our own workforce is also adapting to changing work patterns and demands. In the factory, at a practical level, this has meant implementing new shifts schedules starting from six o’clock in the morning to ten o’clock at night to ensure there are never too many people on site at one time. We have staggered arrival, leaving and break times to mitigate any risks involved at entrances, and we were lucky that space allowed us to make the canteen area bigger and increase the number of toilets from three to ten. We have moved work benches to ensure a safe distance between each employee, and where workflows make two-metre distancing impossible we have installed six- and eight-foot screens. Face masks have been provided to all staff and we are also trialling face shields for further comfort and protection. Our office staff have worked from home, and where going to the office has been necessary, they have similarly adhered to staggered arrival times. Internal communication has been essential and I’m immensely proud and extremely thankful for the positivity, proactivity and support that employees have shown through this process.     We have also adapted our Kentec Installation Partner (KIP) scheme to be fully remote to ensure training and support is there when it is needed for our installers. We are hosting webinars as another forum to solve installer queries remotely, and our new range of Taktis panels have highly advanced networking capabilities and a vast suite of communication tools that support remote monitoring. It is therefore critical that our installers fully understand how to help end users realise the benefits such panels can deliver and to ensure their installations are completed successfully. Looking Ahead To The New Normal Remote monitoring will become increasingly important beyond this crisis We feel that remote monitoring will become increasingly important beyond this crisis and the advanced communication capabilities of panels will be essential for both installers and end users alike. For installers it reduces the amount of time required on site, because they can access the system remotely to find out what equipment or parts they need to take with them. Similarly, for end users they can access systems remotely to check any alerts or queries off site if necessary. It remains to be seen how the rest of 2020 will pan out, but where projects have been necessarily put on hold, because of the essential nature of our industry we are confident that installers will be able to quickly and easily return to these projects when it is safe and feasible to do so. Communication, collaboration and support will continue to be essential in mitigating the challenges in our future ‘new normal.’

Fire Safety In Subsurface Environments
Fire Safety In Subsurface Environments

  Fire safety in road or rail tunnels is critical in avoiding potentially disastrous incidents Roger Wilton, Assistant Technical Manager of the Fire Industry Association (FIA), explains the challenges of preventing underground fires. Fires in tunnels tend to make headline news, largely because of the potential loss of life that such an incident presents. At the turn of the new millennium three catastrophic fires in as many years ensured that tunnel protection became a real focus on the fire safety agenda. In 1999 the Mont Blanc tunnel fire, probably the most well known of the three, resulted in 39 deaths when a Belgian transport truck caught fire, resulting in temperatures of 1,000°C and taking some five days to cool sufficiently for crews to enter the tunnel to begin three years of repairs and significant enhancements of the safety equipment and procedures. This was followed in November 2000 by the Austrian Kaprun funicular tunnel fire which killed some 155 people as they headed for the pistes in a popular ski area some 350 kilometres to the west of Vienna.  Then, in October 2001, the St Gotthard Tunnel in Switzerland, the third longest road tunnel in the world, saw two lorries collide to create a fire that killed eleven people. Tunnel fires have, of course, occurred before and since but three such major incidents in such a short timeframe highlighted very clearly the dangers of tunnel fires and the need to recognise the specific challenges that tunnels present in terms of fire safety engineering. When construction work is undertaken in an underground location, the project plan for safety and in particular fire safety needs to address the extra risks associated with work in an area that, by definition, will have limited means of escape. The area will inevitably be one in which ventilation will be restricted. Lighting will also be a prime consideration. Risk Assessment A comprehensive and dynamic fire risk assessment document is essential for creating a successful fire safety strategy   Managing an emergency successfully is a matter of planning, having the correct equipment in place and employing an effective maintenance programme to ensure that the equipment works when required. The first essential is a risk assessment undertaken by a competent person. Particularly during the construction phase of a project, the risk assessment needs to be a dynamic working document that changes as the work progresses. The ownership and authorship of said document needs to be one of the project manager’s prime tasks. It should link to a project fire and safety strategy document that indicates how the risks identified are being managed and how the process for emergencies are to be handled. For example, if a risk from mechanical plant operating in the underground location is identified, the strategy may require that a mechanical plant containing volatile fuel or gas be fitted with an automatic fire suppression system and that during operation a specified number and type of portable fire extinguishers be available. The strategy document may also require that persons operating the equipment undertake specific training on the use of fire extinguishers. Fire risk and fire strategy are the tools of the trade for driving down financial loss and reducing project delay. A fire risk assessment follows a logical pattern Identify fire hazards Identify people particularly at risk Evaluate, remove, reduce and protect from risks Record, plan, instruct, inform and train Review the plan Specific fire risks in construction work underground are determined on each site. However, all such work will need to consider the following when producing a proposed fire strategy: Difficulties in providing means of escape. Enclosed environment ventilation issues. Access for emergency services.   Whilst tunnels are constructed, fire hazards must be identified and correct fire safety measures taken During a construction project the first requirement of the risk assessment is to identify the fire hazards. This may be one of the most challenging problems as identifying what will burn and is potential ignition risk is linked to use and the experience of the user. The hazards will change as the construction progresses. The risk will increase as initial construction gives way to first and second fix. The materials used in construction are often delivered in flammable packing to prevent transit damage. A management process for safe storage and for efficient removal of packaging materials is required. The need for fire extinguishers suitable for Class A fires (those involving solid materials, such as paper wood or textiles) is apparent. The construction programme can be part of the risk control programme. For example, the completion of enclosed stair routes before other work proceeds can help address safe escape routes. Early provision of a ventilation system will assist in control of the environment to allow escape. Control of the area by a ‘permit to work’ system and a temporary fire alarm system can assist in the risk reduction process. All of the above underlines my assertion that the risk assessment needs to be a dynamic working document that changes as the work progresses. The fire protection of an area can be enhanced by using heat or smoke detection. The services that a tunnel normally carries can form part of the detection. For example, fibre optic cables can form the sensor for a linear heat detection system that can provide precise location information. As with many fire situations, providing warning at the earliest possible point is the goal and identifying the source of a fire is a significant factor in this process. CCTV systems can also provide a smoke detection output as well as supplying video information. From construction to use Once the construction phase is complete the elements of the operation of a tunnel need to be built into the equation. The risk and the fire load - that is the amount of combustible material in the area or passing through - need to be recognised and the fire protection measures employed accordingly. The requirement for fire fighting systems and the location of portable fire extinguishers will depend on the use to which the structure will be put. If personnel are normally located within a given area of the tunnel, the system to alert them to potential danger needs careful consideration. The variety and versatility of voice and message sounders is an important factor here, with voice-based messaging increasingly being used to provide a precise instruction for an evacuation that is not available from a purely tone-based sounder. Rising to the challenge   Both Europe and the USA are conducting ongoing research into methods of more effectively reducing the threat of underground tunnel fires Tunnels provide their own unique fire safety challenges, whether during the construction phase or when the tunnel is actually in use. This article has only scratched the surface of what needs to be considered. Extensive research is ongoing, both in Europe and in the USA, to find methods of further reducing the threat of fire. This is not only in terms of fire prevention, testing the relative strengths and, importantly, the weaknesses of different fire detection technologies, but also in providing the means for safe evacuation to prevent the tragic loss of life which the three incidents highlighted at the outset demonstrate only too well. Roger Wilton - Assistant Technical Manager - Fire Industry Association (FIA)

Latest Chubb Fire & Security news

Chubb Becomes The UK Distributor Of SmartCell Wireless Fire Detection Platform By EMS
Chubb Becomes The UK Distributor Of SmartCell Wireless Fire Detection Platform By EMS

Chubb has been appointed the exclusive UK distributor, installer and service provider of SmartCell, a complete wireless fire detection platform by EMS. The platform provides customers with smaller commercial sites and properties complete control of their fire safety systems’ performance and strategy. Chubb and EMS are part of Carrier, a global provider of innovative heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building automation technologies. Fire safety solution EMS’ new product range, SmartCell, comprises all elements required in a fire safety solution, including an EN-certified control panel, detectors, manual call point, sounder (with visual alarm), a dual input/output device and contact transmitter. Designed with the ability to expand as required, the system can accommodate up to 32 wireless fire and a variety of information devices. A notable feature of SmartCell, and an innovation in the marketplace, is its built-in communications capability, which not only enables remote diagnostics (to identity and remedy potential issues), but also allows all event notifications to be sent to mobile devices via a dedicated Chubb mobile app. This enables customers to have total visibility of their fire system performance, anytime and anywhere. Intelligent cloud-Based communications Chubb has limited exclusive access to the SmartCell system for four months It is also Alarm Receiving Centre (ARC) ready – enabling potential fire alarms to be remotely monitored by a third party, as well as having the ability not only to monitor fire but also floods and potential issues with heating/cooling systems. Making maximum use of EMS’ technology, a market-leader in wireless and hybrid fire detection systems, Chubb has limited exclusive access to the SmartCell system for four months. “With integrated signaling and intelligent cloud-based communications and notifications, the system offers users the ultimate convenience in accessing their fire safety information,” said Richard Drew, FD&A technical and product manager, Chubb. “Compact and with an aesthetically pleasing design, it is quick and simple to install. Its flexibility makes it a user-friendly, commercially-attractive solution for a wide variety of customers and applications.” Whether as a business owner looking for a complete new system, retrofitting or expanding one's existing system, SmartCell offers an easy to install, flexible solution.

Chubb Announces COVID-19 Preventive Measures Taken To Keep Business Safe And Operational
Chubb Announces COVID-19 Preventive Measures Taken To Keep Business Safe And Operational

These are unprecedented times. At Chubb, protecting the health, safety and well-being of the Company’s employees and serving the Company’s customers is top priority. As Chubb navigate the evolving circumstances surrounding the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), the Company are taking actions aligned with the latest information and global guidance to protect the Company’s employees, serve the Company’s customers and minimize the spread of the virus while continuing to provide essential products and services. Chubb have taken important precautionary measures spanning all areas of the Company’s business, both in the Company’s offices and the Company’s field operations, to protect the safety, health and well-being of the Company’s employees and to continue to serve the Company’s customers. Health and safety measures Chubb have implemented enhanced deep cleaning procedures across all facilities, modified processes to enable social distancing, and modified schedules to minimize employee gatherings, including remote working arrangements for those whose jobs allow. Chubb have also provided comprehensive health and safety information to employees at all of the Company’s locations, and will continue to work to identify additional ways to enhance the safety of the Company’s facilities. The Company’s fire and security services and alarm monitoring centers are vital to the protection of the public, industry and critical infrastructure. The Company’s exceptional workforce remains committed to meeting these essential needs for the Company’s customers and ensuring that they, too, can continue to provide their much-needed products and services The Company’s commitment remains steadfast to ensure the safety of the Company’s employees while delivering these essential solutions and services Chubb know customers rely on to keep the world healthy, safe, and comfortable.

Chubb Explains Safe Methods For Disposal Of Fire Extinguishers And Responsibility Of Businesses
Chubb Explains Safe Methods For Disposal Of Fire Extinguishers And Responsibility Of Businesses

The world is changing. Trends in urbanization and population growth require more sustainable solutions to move the world forward. From a business perspective, sustainability means that companies can do good for the planet whilst also doing good for employees, communities and customers. As a fire and security business, Chubb protects businesses globally, helping to make the world a safer place. However, the very tool that is used to counter the threat of fire also poses an environmental and physical threat of its own. A fire extinguisher is a pressurized product and classified as hazardous waste. This means care must be taken in its disposal to avoid causing harm to people and the environment. Safe disposal of fire extinguishers There have been a number of cases recorded in the media of accidents occurring after fire extinguishers are not properly disposed of. When it comes to fire extinguishers, not all disposal methods are made equal. In reality, there are significant differences in safety and environmental impact depending on the disposal method one chooses. While domestic disposal is provided by the state, businesses are required to dispose of fire extinguishers themselves For example, there was a very serious incident of a fire extinguisher being carelessly thrown into the back of a rubbish-collection lorry. This might sound like a routine and harmless incident. However, the pressure of the rubbish-collection truck caused the ‘disposed of’ fire extinguisher to explode. Luckily, no one was injured, but the risk to the waste-collection workers and to the people in the surrounding area was significant. This incident could have been totally avoided with the application of the correct fire extinguisher disposal method. Businesses’ responsibility in disposal While domestic disposal is provided by the state, businesses are required to dispose of their fire extinguishers themselves. While most businesses are responsible, there are some who resort to illegal fly tipping. Earlier, a pile of 400 extinguishers was found dumped in the UK’s beauty area of the Peak District, causing an environmental risk as well as a danger to life. Points to note when one is looking to dispose of one’s fire extinguisher. The rating and type of one’s fire extinguisher. The point in its life cycle is one’s fire extinguisher, and if it been used before. If one’s fire extinguisher still pressurized, one must look to release any excess pressure and leave one’s fire extinguisher to settle for a few days. One is not to throw out one’s fire extinguisher and not leave it out in the street. Domestic disposal is available through recycling centers. Commercial disposal is available through one’s fire and security service provider. Safe processing, recycling and disposal Chubb Fire & Security Extinguisher Recycling Unit, a dedicated facility offering a service for the safe processing, recycling and disposal of fire extinguishers across the UK, recycled 85,784 extinguishers. The recycled plastic can be re-used in road-surfacing products, children’s play areas, rail production for aggregates, or simply recycled to have a new life as another product. Chubb has worked closely with the Environment Agency to develop safe, efficient and environmentally friendly processes, ensuring that that its site maintains its ISO14001 certification. Every business has a legal responsibility to protect its people, buildings and assets from the hazards of fire. Failure to do so can result in prosecution, even if one have outsourced the disposal to a third party. Part of this responsibility means ensuring that all firefighting equipment including extinguishers is maintained and serviced properly by a competent person. As with any pressurized container, a fire extinguisher should be treated with respect. In fact, a fire extinguisher can become dangerous if it has been mistreated or abused, or if it has reached the end of its life cycle. One must ensure one’s business complies, and always recycle responsibly.

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