Software - Expert Commentary

Fire Service Training: Assessing & Auditing Behavioral Markers
Fire Service Training: Assessing & Auditing Behavioral Markers

It is well reported that incident numbers attended by the UK Fire and Rescue Services have reduced over the last decade, partially as a result of the improved fire safety education conducted by dedicated teams in community fire safety, and other related activities. In particular, during the period 2008-2018, there was a 20% reduction in total fire calls. However, in 2019, there was a small annual rise in the number of fires attended, and in particular, secondary fires. (Home Office, 2020). As a consequence, the total number of fires a firefighter will attend in a career starting in 2020 is likely to be significantly fewer than a firefighter who began their career in 1990. As such an alternative strategy is required to compensate for the reduced opportunities to ‘learn on the job’ in order to meet the same learning outcomes required of all roles, firefighter to chief fire officer. Clearly, this is not easy: fire environments are dynamic, multi-faceted, typically incorporate large volumes of “complex data” and are personnel or resource heavy to simulate accurately. However, the employment of hybrid reality, augmented reality and virtual reality training has demonstrated success across a number of services, and post-COVID-19 is likely to continue to rise in prevalence. firefighter operational training A significant proportion of firefighter operational training is centred on technical equipment use, and it is not always easy or possible to create a physical space where training with them is easy. Yet virtual worlds, with their limitless possibilities, allow us to create practically any scenario and with any combination of tools to use. The employment of hybrid reality, augmented reality and virtual reality training has demonstrated success across a number of services The introduction of new tactical options, such as cold-cut Cobra, or the Emergency One “E1 Scorpion” would traditionally follow a relatively slow uptake-arc, as only a certain number of operators can be familiar with it initially, and we would expect an increase in usage as awareness is gradually built up. However, in a virtual environment, all firefighter or commanders can experiment with all potential tactical options, as there is no limit on availability or scenario complexity. During Fire officer training, there are elements of role or support functions which are not suited to virtual worlds, these generally involve human interactions, and the application of dynamic administrative tasks like decision logging and information processing. To improve the accuracy and value of the training this dynamic is often achieved through the use of actors, role players and “props” to augment the virtual training environment. This hybrid approach enables all aspects of firefighter or fire officer roles to be developed as realistically as possible, honing skills in the classroom that can be applied in the incident ground. Judgement in high pressure situations In conjunction with this development in the training environment, and the recognition that training now plays a central part in building a commander’s capabilities, considerable work on understanding and developing these behaviours associated with decision making, have been the focus of several major research projects (Butler et al. 2020, Cohen-Hatton et al. 2015). In addition, the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) had identified that commanders’ judgement in high pressure situations, especially where risk appetite was concerned, needed some consideration. Effectively they recognized that this was a “human factors” consideration, where the commander themselves was the factor posing the greatest risk (to themselves, the public and to the people they are in command of) (CFOA, 2015). Command decision making skills and the application of human factors throughout training are now widely recognized as essential components in the development of a fire officers skill set. Fire Services are effectively required to train commanders in those skills, allow them to develop and maintain them and in particular systematically record and evaluate the strength of those skills. The Effective Command model The Effective Command model developed in 2015 offers a solution to this challenge. It follows a behavioral marker philosophy and can be used to record operational competence achieved during training, incident monitoring or formal assessment, from incidents or simulated training environments. Command decision making skills and the application of human factors throughout training are now widely recognized as essential A rich multi-mode training environment allows in the development of Recognition primed decision making, where the experience is rich enough to become a part of a commander’s knowledge base, allowing them to determine the nature of problems, quickly and resolve them based on past successful experiences. The Effective Command training methodology aligns with the five principles of simulator-based exercise team training, as outlined by Crichton (2017). Principle 1 - Develop learning objectives and expected performance standards Through the use of scenarios, incident commanders are presented with unexpected events or dilemmas (Lamb et al, 2014). These cues stimulate the expected behaviours and allow relevant behavioral markers to be practiced or demonstrated. Principle 2 - Train the team or individuals Training the individual in non-technical skills is often overlooked during training and development of Fire Officers. Principle 3 - Use a structured observation tool The structured observation tool Effective Command is used to capture positive behaviours as well as areas for improvement. The framework is also used as a basis of the training design, used to provide feedback and for self-reflection by the student. Principle 4 - Provide feedback during a structured debrief Feedback is given face-to-face immediately following a scenario-based exercise, and behaviours observed during the exercise are highlighted. Principle 5 - Repeat the Training regularly It has been identified in a recent study (Lamb et al, 2020) that structured and holistic training and assessment systems, like Effective Command, provide an efficient and auditable way of developing and assessing Fire Officers. Enabling data trends to be fed into subsequent training cycles to maximize continual organizational development. Through the employment of a consistent behavioral framework, the process of developing essential knowledge and behaviours begins earlier and ensures firefighters are safer and more effective both immediately and as future officers.

Aviation Incidents: A Look at Local Authority Fire Service Response
Aviation Incidents: A Look at Local Authority Fire Service Response

One if the few bonuses of the 2020 COVID-19 Lockdown in the UK was the dramatic reduction of aircraft noise around our homes. Certainly in the Southeast of England, it gave us some thought as to the number of aircraft in the sky, and what the consequences might be if something went wrong… Aviation in the UK is split between what is known as Commercial Airport Transport (CAT) and General Aviation (GA). The CAT sector operates out of 25 airports and accounts for around 900 aircraft. However, the GA sector accounts for 15,000 aircraft, flown by 32,000 pilots, operating out of 125 aerodromes licensed by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and over 1,000 other flying sites (According to the General Aviation Awareness Council – our mapping data suggested 1650 sites) (1,2). Roughly 96% of the aircraft in the UK are engaged in General Aviation, engaged in business, leisure engineering and training activities, and HM Government estimate that the sector employs around 38,000 people (3). Each licensed airfield has its own firefighting response, termed airport rescue and firefighting services (RFFS) governed by the CAA guidelines and they are required to be:- .. proportionate to the aircraft operations and other activities taking place at the aerodrome; Provide for the coordination of appropriate organizations to respond to an emergency at the aerodrome or in its surroundings; Contain procedures for testing the adequacy of the plan, and for reviewing the results in order to improve its effectiveness. (CAA 2020) Ensuring Adequate firefighter training So simply put, each airfield needs to ensure it has adequate training, media, personnel in appropriate quantities to deal with any likely incident, given its size and traffic. There are around 1654 airfields in the UK, with 125 of those being licensed However, this is only limited to licensed airfields and the response is typically limited to the airfield itself, and the immediate surrounding area. Airfield vehicles are often specialist aviation firefighting vehicles – not necessarily suitable for driving potentially long distances to an incident. Even so, it is a well-established principle that RRFS would only fight the initial stages of any fire, to be relieved by, and with command passed to local authority fire services. There are around 1654 airfields in the UK, with 125 of those being licensed. In 2019-2020 (to date) there have been 62 air crashes, of which 9 involved a fatality. If we plot the locations of all airfields of any type, all the licensed airfields and the crashes, we can see the spatial relationship between them. Below, we see the two distributions – on the left, crashes versus all airfields and on the right crashes versus licensed fields. It’s clear that the crosses (crashes) and dots (fields) are not always in the same place, so clearly there is a potential problem here – namely the specialized airfield fire response is unlikely to be able to respond. Using the spatial analytical capability of QGIS, the open-source GIS software, we can then start to look at the distances from the airfields of the crashes. We can see that (based on the 2019-2020 data) that on average a crash occurs 3.22km from an airfield, but 15.78km from a licensed airfield (where the firefighting teams are). The maximum distance from a licensed airfield was 57.41km, two thirds of the crashes were more than 10km from a licensed airfield and over a third were more than 18km away. Fig 1a (left) shows crashes versus all airfields. Fig 1b (right) shows crashes versus licensed airfields only. Aircraft incidents pose complex firefighting challenges So, what does this all mean? Well the simple conclusion we can draw from this data is that there is a sizable risk of an aircrash occurring on the grounds of a non-airport fire service. In 2019-2020 there have been 62 air crashes, of which 9 involved a fatality Bearing that in mind, it’s also worth considering that aircraft incidents pose challenges to firefighters and firefighting, that need to be considered. The construction of aircraft has been evolving since the first days of flight, with materials that are strong, light and cheap to produce being adopted and in recent years created to order. This has seen a move from natural materials, such as wood and canvas towards aluminum and man-made materials, and in recent years man made mineral fibres (MMMFs) which are lighter and stronger than natural materials, and can be moulded into any shape. The problem is, MMMFs disintegrate into minuscule fibres when subject to impact or fire, which can stick like tiny needles into firefighters’ skin, leading to skin conditions, and pose a significant risk to respiratory systems if breathed in. As with all fires, there are risks associated with smoke products, with exposure to fuels and other chemicals and so there is the potential for a widespread hazmat incident, with respiratory and contamination hazards. Finally, there is always the risk, more so perhaps with military aircraft, of explosives or dangerous cargoes on the aircraft that put firefighters at risk. The problem is therefore this: There is a constant, but small, chance of an aviation incident occurring away from an airport, and requiring local authority fire services to act as the initial response agency, rather than a relieving agency. These incidents, when they do occur, are likely to be unfamiliar to responding crews, yet also present risks that need to be addressed. PLANE Thinking Despite this landscape of complex risk and inconsistent response coverage non-airfield fire services can still create an effective response structure in the event of an aviation incident away from an airfield. We have drawn up a simple, 5-step aide-memoire for structuring a response, following the acronym PLANE (Plan, Learn, Adapt, Nurture, Evolve). We are aware that all brigades will do this already to some extent (in fact they are obliged to). We are also aware that there was little point going into the technical details of firefighting itself – that is handled elsewhere and in far more detail – but instead we considered a broad, high-level system to act as a quick sanity check on the response measures already in place. There is always the risk, more so perhaps with military aircraft, of explosives or dangerous cargoes on the aircraft that put firefighters at risk In many ways this mirrors existing operational risk exercises, and begins with a planning process – considering the nature of risk in the response area, building links with other agencies and operators, and collating and analyzing intelligence. Services should expand their levels of knowledge (Learn) around the issue, and consider appointing tactical advisors for aviation incidents and using exercises and training programs to test and enhance response. Having identified the risk landscape, and invested in intelligence about it, we may then need to consider adapting our approaches to make sure we are ready to respond, and having carried out all of this activity, we need to keep the momentum going, and continue to nurture those relationships, and that expertise cross the service. Rapid technological advancement Aviation technology does not stand still. Many of us will have seen this week the testing in the lake district of the emergency response jetpack (4), and this is just one example of the pace of technological advances in the sector. Consider the huge emerging market of UAVs, commercially and recreationally and the potential for incidents related to them, as well as their potential application in responses. Finally, Services, potentially through their dedicated TacAd roles, need to keep abreast of emerging technologies, and ensure that the Planning and Learning continues to match the risk. Aviation technology does not stand still So, in conclusion, we have a (very) simple system for preparing for the potential for airline incidents off airfields. We are happy to admit that it’s not going to solve all of every brigades’ problems, and we’d like to think it simply holds a mirror to existing activities. We do hope that it does give a bit of structure to the consideration a potentially complex process, and that it is of some use, if only as a talking point. Best practices and technologies and will be among the topics discussed at the Aerial Firefighting Europe Conference, taking place in Nîmes, France on 27 – 28 April 2021. The biennial event provides a platform for over 600 international aerial firefighting professionals to discuss the ever-increasing challenges faced by the industry.   References 1. General Aviation Awareness Council. Fact Sheet 1 - What is General Aviation (GA)? 2008. 2. Anon. UK Airfields KML. google maps. 2020. 3. Davies B. General Aviation Strategic Network Recommendations. GA Champion, 2018. 4. Barbour S. Jet suit paramedic tested in the Lake District “could save lives.” BBC News. 2020. Article Written by Chris Heywood and Dr Ian Greatbatch.

Keeping Emergency Services Teams Secure And Connected
Keeping Emergency Services Teams Secure And Connected

Every day, across the globe, emergency services teams come to people’s aid no matter the situation to ensure their safety. Whether it’s during a natural disaster, or at a significant event, the emergency services are on hand to face any challenge that comes their way. When supporting this crucial workforce, it is essential that they have robust and reliable connectivity. Technology is becoming a vital aspect of public safety and security worldwide, and this trend is only likely to grow. For these new devices to work effectively, full-scale coverage must be in place, and when it comes to people’s safety, there is no room for error. The need for redundancy and high bandwidth  Two of the paramount tools at emergency services disposal are video surveillance and communication devices. Constant visibility and communication are often essential to protecting people and saving lives. The benefits range from providing first responders with a clear picture and understanding of the situation they are about to encounter; to providing greater safety during public events by enabling officers to control crowds and manage traffic effectively. Enhancing visibility and sharing information is particularly crucial during fires to guide firefighters and vehicles through flames and smoke, and to allow the central command center to organize resources effectively. Technology is becoming a vital aspect of public safety and security worldwide, and this trend is only likely to grow Despite any potential challenges ensuring network connectivity may create, public safety organizations cannot compromise when it comes to optimizing security. For IP video surveillance and cellphone broadband connectivity to operate effectively, they require redundancy and high bandwidth. Without these connectivity attributes, devices become useless; for example, there are municipalities where as much as 50 percent of the camera network is offline because of poor product choices and inferior network design and installation. Equally, poor quality networking can be just as limiting as it can lead to public safety organizations being unable to receive real-time data. All areas must also have adequate bandwidth to access data, such as on-scene video, aerial imagery, maps, and images, and many existing public safety networks do not have that capacity. Supporting security and safety robotics Robots and drones have seen a considerable increase in popularity this year, with 60 million such machines being deployed according to ABI Research. They offer a wealth of potential to emergency services teams, whether on land, air, or sea. For example, water rescue robots can go where humans cannot, earthquake and fire robots can search through otherwise non-navigable areas, and drones can survey vast regions. However, for these wireless devices to work effectively, they rely on many features. They need low power consumption so as not to heavily burden the onboard power source of the robotic device and, perhaps, a high level of encryption so information cannot be stolen or hacked. There are also benefits to security and safety as robotic devices can communicate with one another peer-to-peer. Directly mounting radios to robots and drones, fosters dynamic self-learning, data sharing, and more wireless paths in the event one or more of the devices in an area do not have a link to fixed infrastructure. Water rescue robots can go where humans cannot, earthquake and fire robots can search through otherwise non-navigable areas, and drones can survey vast regions The main component that security and safety robotics require is redundant and resilient connections. If the connection is lost, the connected device will go into “safe” mode and stop. Creating a high capacity network that supports mobile devices in complex and fast-moving environments is not a simple task. In many cases, it requires a network that supports many wireless connections and allows for many paths in and out, so that if a link is lost, another path is available for data transmission and reception. This type of network is the best way to ensure that police, firefighters, and emergency units can access and send large amounts of data from wherever they are and in real-time making a massive difference to the efficiency of the emergency services. An example of this is Rajant’s private Kinetic Mesh® network, a wireless network ensuring no single point of failure. It offers reliable, intelligent, and secure wireless broadband connectivity that survives and thrives in evolving and mobility-driven environments. It forms a “living” mesh network that can move with and adapt to the evolving communication requirements of public safety organizations. Technology in action Back in October 2019, the heat from the sun, combined with winds gusting through the foothills of El Capitán Canyon in California, sparked a bush fire in the overly dry, desert hills. Despite four hundred and twenty acres being burnt, firefighters used their experience and skills combined with newfound digital technology to ensure that no structures were damaged, and there were no reported injuries. The Santa Barbara County Fire Department, Cal Fire, the U.S Forest Service, and other agencies were immediately dispatched to contain the fire. More than 200 firefighters were needed to combat the fire and reinforce containment lines with helicopters and drones in the air and bulldozers on the ground. To operate this equipment, mesh radio nodes, bonded cellular, and satellite technologies were used to link the communication gap in locations where signals are often dropped. Rajant BreadCrumb® nodes were mounted to the fire-breaking, 30-ton bulldozers manned by trained firefighters to uproot vegetation and eliminate the materials that would further spread the fire. Robots and drones have seen a considerable increase in popularity this year, with 60 million such machines being deployed  The reliable connectivity allowed the bulldozers to not only easily communicate with each other and the base, but also to send video footage and data to the tactical truck and central command post over cellular and SAT networks. This situational awareness data transfer allowed for greater efficiency, as well as increased safety for the public and the firefighters. Reliability when you need it most Reliable connectivity solutions are being embraced across the emergency services due to the innumerable benefits they bring to ensuring the safety of the public. For police, firefighters, and emergency units, dependable connectivity allows for rapid, real-time response, and the use of technology can save lives in ways that wouldn’t have seemed possible a decade ago. Planned and unplanned events can benefit from the new technology being introduced, and emergency services need to make sure they have the network capabilities to support them. For environments that are challenging and hostile, this requires a network available on-demand, which can withstand the demands of harsh conditions and mobility while maintaining a level of redundancy and high bandwidth that allows for accessing and sending large amounts of data from any location.

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Fire Industry Manufacturers’ Expo Will Host Seminars And Display Products And Developments In The Fire Industry in 2019
Fire Industry Manufacturers’ Expo Will Host Seminars And Display Products And Developments In The Fire Industry in 2019

The next Fire Industry Manufacturers’ (FIM) Expo which will take place Wednesday 16th October, 2019. This time the FIM Expo will take place at Sheffield United Football Club. Organized by the Fire Industry Association (FIA), FIM Expo features many of the UK's pioneer fire detection and alarm manufacturers and focuses on showcasing the latest products and developments in this sector of the industry.A wide range of exhibitors are confirmed so far: Advanced Global Fire Equipment Ampac Haes Systems Apollo Hochiki Baldwin Boxall Kentec BAFE Lan Control Systems C-Tec Morley-IAS Eaton Nittan Eurotech SSAIB Everlux Sterling Safety Systems FFE Vimpex FirePro Xtralis Fire protection systems Fire protection systems The FIM Expo is for anyone working in this area, whether as an installer or maintainer of fire detection and alarm systems, a manager of such systems in commercial premises or as an architect or person specifying what type of fire protection systems should be installed in a building. The FIA will also be hosting two free, CPD accredited, seminars at the Expo. Both sessions will focus on key topics affecting FD&A world. Those interested can meet the Membership Manager and enquire about the benefits of FIA membership First session will start at 10am and Will Lloyd, Technical Manager at the FIA will present the ‘Overview of the Changes to: BS 5839-6:2019’. Second seminar will start right after lunch at 1pm and Ian Moore CEO of the Fire Industry Association will give an introduction to the Interim Report of the Industry Response Group following on from Dame Judith Hackitt’s post Grenfell Tower Review. Fire protection training and qualifications The Fire Industry Association will also have a stand, so that those interested can meet the Membership Manager and enquire about the benefits of FIA membership (which includes discounts on fire protection training and qualifications, and the possibility of a stand at FIM Expo).Chris Tilley, FIA Membership Manager comments that: “Competency and how you prove it is at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now, and if it’s not then it should be. At FIM Expo this October the FIA have invited BAFE and leading certification bodies to offer you a one stop shop solution. Come and visit us to get expert industry advice on how best to achieve competency for your company and engineers”. With an average of 25 exhibitors over the last few years, FIM Expo has grown to become the best local expo for the fire industry. FIM Expo is open from 08.30 to 15.30 on Wednesday 16th October and is free to attend. Parking and refreshments are also available free of charge, including a buffet.

Morley-IAS ZX5SE Control Panel Based Fire Detection System Protects Chester Zoo
Morley-IAS ZX5SE Control Panel Based Fire Detection System Protects Chester Zoo

Also, Honeywell D1 system and All-Spec air sampling device were installed at the zoo In 1930, George Mottershead bought Oakfield House in Chester, along with seven acres of land, for the grand total of £3,500. He then visited a zoo in Manchester and what he saw that day inspired him to create ‘a zoo without bars’. George opened Chester Zoo in 1931 with his family and a small group of animals, never forgetting the vow he made. By the time he died in 1978, aged 84, Mottershead’s dream of a ‘zoo without bars’ was well and truly flourishing. Fast forward to 2015 and with more than 12,500 animals in 125 acres of award-winning zoological gardens, Chester Zoo is one of the world’s top attractions of its kind. 1.4 million people visit every year and its mission is to be a major force in conserving biodiversity. The latest attraction is Chester Zoo’s Islands, which aims to transport visitors to the South East Asian islands of Panay, Papua, Bali, Sumba, Sumatra and Sulawesi. Work began on the £40m, 60,000m² development in 2013 and it has taken almost two years and thousands of working hours to build. The largest indoor zoo exhibit in UK history, Monsoon Forest is the centrepiece of the Islands and the second phase of the project to be completed. Islands gives visitors the chance to take a walk or boat ride past turtles, Sumatran tigers, cassowary birds and many other species, as well as through bamboo copses and rice paddies. It is also home to the Sundra gharial, one of the world’s largest crocodiles, whose habitat is cleverly set out so these remarkable creatures can be seen both above and under the water through spectacular glass viewing windows. An advanced PA/VA and fire detection solution Crown House Technologies (part of Laing O’Rourke) is the M&E contractor for the Islands project and sub-contracted Morecambe based Cook Fire & Security Ltd to provide the fire detection system for the Monsoon Forest. Joe Weiss, ‎Technical Director at Cook Fire & Security, states, “Over the last 14 years we have become one of the leading installers of state-of-the-art solutions throughout the north-west of England and beyond. We have been involved in some highly prestigious projects but the Monsoon Forest was a unique environment and required some significant thought about the best way to protect, staff, visitors and, of course, the animals.” A Honeywell D1 system allowed Cook Fire & Security to combine advanced audio management with a flexible architecture to deliver an advanced PA/VA solution at Monsoon Forest. Generally, this type of technology is utilised in public or larger buildings and, following the detection of smoke or fire, automated messages control the flow of people, allowing an orderly evacuation without panic. However – as animal welfare is at the very heart of Chester Zoo’s activities - one of the key priorities was to have a PA/VA system that could alert staff and visitors without causing distress to the creatures living there. Joe Weiss comments, “Obviously, the animals are used to the sound of human voices, so we felt that a PA/VA system would be more appropriate than the type of loud siren commonly used.” Monsoon Forest is entirely enclosed and with temperatures reaching highs of 80°F, this level of humidity meant that a great deal of consideration had to be given to the most suitable fire detection system. A solution based around the Morley-IAS ZX5SE control panel was installed in the keeper’s section, as it is intuitive to use and easy to install, network, configure, maintain and expand. The public areas, however, required a solution that could offer high levels of false alarm prevention while blending in with the tropical surroundings. An aspirating smoke detection system Explaining the thought process, Weiss says, “Due to the height of the roof, access for installation and maintenance of a conventional or addressable system would have been problematic. Also, the high levels of moisture would have also been a problem and could have triggered false alarms. Therefore, an aspirating smoke detection system was the most suitable option.” A Honeywell All-Spec system was chosen and Martyn Keenan, Business Manager (North West) for Morley-IAS says, “As a universal air sampling device for a broad range of applications, All-Spec makes it possible to achieve a cost effective solution in accordance with EN 54-20. This allows the devices to be used in areas where other smoke detectors and air sampling smoke detection systems are no longer suitable, such as Monsoon Forest. By putting water traps on all pipework going back to the control panels, an extra level of false alarm detection has been achieved.” A highly innovative way of installing the system was employed, as the pipework was fitted when the roof interior was on the ground and then hoisted into position. This eliminated the need for access equipment and ensures that the environment will not need to be disturbed during any planned maintenance. Aesthetics were also important and white plastic was used to ensure that the system blended into the overall appearance of the roof structure. Ian McIntosh, health & safety manager at the zoo at Chester Zoo is delighted with the fire detection system that has been installed, and concluded, “The response to Monsoon Forest since it opened has been terrific and it is now a key part of the Chester Zoo experience. However, we also value the role that technology plays in keeping our staff, visitors and animals safe, which is why having Honeywell fire detection technology installed by Cook Fire & Security gives us peace of mind.”

Morley-IAS By Honeywell Voice Alarm System Protects City Of London School
Morley-IAS By Honeywell Voice Alarm System Protects City Of London School

Security alert buttons have been installed at first-floor staff entrance along with a fire microphone The 1,000 pupils and staff at the 570-year-old City of London School – one of Britain’s most photographed educational establishments – are now protected by a Morley-IAS by Honeywell voice alarm system. Installed by Ardent Fire & Security in a major overhaul of voice alarm and public address technology, the school, which is on the Thames embankment near St Paul’s Cathedral, now has a highly customised system that provides safety cover throughout its prominent site. A highly-customised Honeywell voice alarm system Replacing the previous obsolete system, Ardent, a Morley-IAS distributor, installed the Honeywell D1 rack and amplifiers along with 32 new speakers and new alert buttons. The buttons can be pressed to trigger specific public address messages in locations such as the swimming pool area and playground, while announcements can be made from both the reception desk and the office of the head teacher’s personal assistant. In the event of an alert, one of 18 separate safety messages is issued over the system, each of which is tailored to the school’s particular requirements. This allows disruption to be kept to a minimum, without compromising safety. In addition, security alert buttons have been installed at the first-floor staff entrance along with a fire microphone for the use of emergency services. As well as installing new speakers to ensure coverage is provided throughout the school, Ardent also optimised the operation of the in situ public address speakers. With its origins in the reign of Henry V, the school occupies a prominent site close to the Millennium Bridge, making it possibly the most photographed school in the UK. An independent day school owned and governed by the City of London, its former old boys include Sir Walter Raleigh and long-serving 20th Century Prime Minister Herbert Asquith. Integrated existing fire protection system, Morley-IAS control panel, and PA system The work was completed in two-and-a-half weeks during the Easter holidays and followed Ardent’s successful upgrade of integration between the existing fire protection system, a recently installed Morley-IAS ZX5Se control panel and the public address system. “The D1 system has amazing software with incredible flexibility – meaning it could do all that the school required,” said Adam Sutherland, Ardent director. “Any other system would have required a huge amount of re-cabling, but the D1’s sensitivity means it can work superbly with the existing infrastructure.” Currently based in Chelmsford, Ardent Fire & Security has staff with long industry experience, providing a full range of fire system expertise including PA systems and large network panels.

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