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Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants
Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants

There is a sense in some markets that the paper and pulp industry will decline owing to the digital technologies with which people interact every day. While this might be considered logical, the reality is completely different. In fact, the paper and pulp industry has experienced a steady growth and will continue to do so in 2021. Production of paper increased by more than 450% in the last decades and the demand of paperboard in the world is expected to grow significantly, driven by e-commerce and big retailers increasing their presence in the online sales universe. This sustained growth in production capacity and paper consumption presents several fire risks to companies and exposes communities that develop around paper mills, to the impact of disasters caused by these fire risks. Fire risks in the paper and pulp industry Paper and cardboard are combustible, but this is not the only fire risk found in these types of industries. Raw materials and finished goods storage are sensitive to fire. In addition, the paper making process includes several stages where fires can occur, due to hot surfaces or poor ventilation. The most relevant fire risks on a paper plant are: Storage Areas: As mentioned before, paper and cardboard are combustible. Solid paper blocks and reels have hard surfaces that don’t ignite easily, but usually these reels can suffer minor damages or have loose sheets that significantly increase the fire risk. When paper reels are stacked in columns, gaps in the center can act as chimneys and when fires start in the bottom of the stack, this chimney effect will accelerate smoke and hot air spread, increasing vertical and horizontal flame spread. Wood and Bale storage fire risks Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present Raw materials for the paper making process can have two main sources, forestry products (mainly wood) or recycled cardboard and paper. Wood storage presents several challenges, especially due to wood chips that are highly combustible and, in some cases, even explosive. Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present. Fire in baled paper is difficult to extinguish and generates heavy smoke. In many recycling facilities, these paper bales are stored outdoors, where paper or rags soaked in flammable liquids, embedded between the paper sheets, can ignite resulting in a fast spreading fire. Chemicals, flammable liquids and gases In addition, it is possible to find different types of chemicals, flammable liquids and gases that are used in the paper making process. These materials have their own fire-related risks that need to be taken in consideration. Production Areas: In pulp factories, there are several long-distance conveyors that transport wood and wood chips. These conveyors constitute a fire risk and the most probable causes of fire are bearing damage, overheating of the conveyor and igniting chips in the environment. IR dryers, a common source of fire After the wood has been transported, chipped and digested, the paper making process becomes extremely humid, due to the large amounts of hot water and steam needed. But, as soon as the pulp fiber sheet starts to dry, the hot surfaces in contact with the paper sheets can be a source of ignition. IR dryers used in the process are also a common source of fire in the paper industry. When the sheet of paper is formed, close contact with reels and bearings moving fast can create static electricity that could ignite loose paper or airborne particles. Problems like these are likely to be more extensive in tissue mills. Paper dust is generated in certain parts of the process, especially where paper shits are slit or cut. Poorly insulated steam pipes lead to fire Poorly insulated steam pipes can ignite paper dust or even their own insulation materials. In addition, paper dust gathers in the ventilation grills of machinery, causing overheating and igniting as well. Heated oil is used in several parts of the process as well and if a malfunction occurs on the Hot Oil Roll systems, leaks might occur, exposing hot surfaces to this oil and causing ignitions. A paper mill has hydraulically operated machinery, where leaks or sprays might ignite as well. Service Areas: As in many other manufacturing facilities, several service areas can be found. Electrical and network equipment rooms have an inherent fire risk due to damaged wires or equipment, overheating or short circuits in high voltage circuits. Transformer and generator areas entail fire risks as well. High fire risk for boiler rooms Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves Hot water and steam are key components for the paper making process. For this reason, paper plants use high capacity boilers that can be powered by flammable liquids or gases. A high fire risk can be considered for boiler rooms. Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves. In addition to the fire risks mentioned in these areas, many maintenance operations can also pose fire risk, especially when hot works are being performed. Sparks caused by welding or the use of certain tools can ignite paper sheets or dust in the air. Poor housekeeping and buildup of paper dust, for example, increases the risk associated with maintenance and construction works. Prevention, the first line of defense According to the Health and Safety Executive from the United Kingdom, 60% of fires on paper mills are caused by machine faults and poor housekeeping. The first line of defense to avoid fire risks in paper plants is prevention. As mentioned before, a high number of fires in these types of facilities occur because of poor housekeeping and machine malfunction. The key is to identify the risks and possible ignition sources, and apply measures to minimize them. As in many industries, fire protection has two main components: Passive and Active protection. Passive fire protection measures Passive measures include fire rated walls, ceilings, and floors in the most critical areas. Chemical storage areas should be physically separated from other dangerous areas, if this is not possible then the walls separating areas should be fire rated and materials must be stored in a way that minimizes the risk of fire spread by radiation or conduction. Proper compartmentalization and intumescent protection of structural elements should be part of the package as well. Passive measures include proper ventilation and smoke control. As mentioned before, paper dust is a major fire risk, which is why ventilation and cleaning of hoods over the paper machine is important to minimize the possibility of ignition. Fire resisting construction should be designed with the following goals in mind: Protection of escape routes Form compartments to contain fires that might occur Separate areas of higher fire risk Protect load bearing and structural members to minimize risk of collapse Sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades. Finished goods stored indoors should be protected with sprinkler systems and the same should be considered for chemical storage areas and certain raw materials. Paper bales, ideally should be protected by sprinklers that are suitably designed to cope with the height and located, in all cases, 3 meters above the level of bales stacked vertically (which should not exceed 5 meters height). Spark detectors in hoods, pipes and ventilation systems Dangerous sparks could be generated in several parts of the paper making process, which is why spark detectors must be installed in hoods, pipes, and ventilation systems. Water spray and CO2 systems can be used to protect machinery against these risks. Means to fight fires, like extinguishers and hose reels, should be provided to support fire brigades. All the elements should be properly identified and all personnel should be trained and made aware of the location of such devices. Importance of fire alarms Fire alarms are required in all paper mills and fire alarm call points should be provided in all locations, according to international guidelines, such as NFPA 72 or EN54. The spread of flames and smoke in paper, wood and chemical storage might become extremely fast. For this reason, early detection is critical. Many technologies might be applied in the different areas of a paper plant. Nevertheless, there are dusty or humid areas where regular heat or smoke detectors might fail under certain circumstances. For these areas, especially located outdoors, innovative state-of-the-art detection solutions might be applied, like Video Fire Detection (VFD). NFPA 72 standard for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection, opening interesting alternatives for designers and fire protection engineers. Many EHS managers and fire protection professionals selected VFD, because it is the only fire detection solution that effectively covered their needs. Many engineers, specialized in fire protection for paper plants, explained that they tested linear heat detection, aspiration smoke detection, IR/UV detectors and even beams, but none of these technologies performed as they needed on the dirtiest or more humid areas. Video Fire Detection (VFD) solutions Outdoor storage areas are often unprotected, because deploying flame or heat detection in large open areas can be costly and mostly ineffective. VFD solutions can detect smoke and flames in outdoor conditions, allowing the monitoring and protection of wood and paper bales in large areas. Fire detection and alarm systems should be designed with the following goals: Minimize risk of fires, including the use of fire detection technology in areas where regular detection technologies cannot be implemented or are not practical. Minimize risk of flame and smoke spread, with state-of-the-art detection algorithms that guarantee fast and effective detection. Also, reliable algorithms minimize the possibility of nuance or unwanted alarms. In case of a fire, fast detection gives occupants life-saving time to reach to a place of safety, before the flames and smoke have spread to dangerous levels. Global production of paper and pulp reached 490 million tons in 2020, with many industries and markets depended on the paper and pulp supply chain. That is why innovative ways to protect this supply chain, are key to sustain the paper market growth in the future.

Mobile Firefighting Systems Provide Flexible Fire Protection For Major Facilities
Mobile Firefighting Systems Provide Flexible Fire Protection For Major Facilities

Within traditional commercial and industrial firefighting systems, engineers have primarily focused on permanent installation designs rather than entertaining alternative or supplemental mobile firefighting systems. Permanent installation design is typically better understood, supported, and supplied throughout the fire protection engineering and manufacturing community. However, mobile firefighting systems provide unique solutions and advantages compared to their permanent installation cousins such as flexible deployment, simpler servicing, improved economy, and much higher performance availability. The combination of both systems is frequently the most strategic solution for the facility operator. Limitations of fixed installation systems Permanent installation (fixed) systems include everything from sprinklers, foam systems, primary watermain pumps, and the plethora of piping in between. A large refinery complex will need to address various hazard mitigation and control problems that span both hardware and personnel needs. In the event standard hazard mitigation safety procedures and equipment have failed, the facility immediately initiates a hazard control operation. Passive fixed systems automatically engage the hazard through an array of sensors, mechanical triggers, and control algorithms. A properly designed system with adequate hazard coverage, preplanning, preventative maintenance, and testing will successfully terminate the hazard, while firefighting personnel respond and ensure no further hazards develop. This conceptual approach relies on hardware and personnel all operating as planned…. Combining permanent and mobile apparatus “According to plan” would never have any failures or fires, but history has a different script. In the worst-case petrochemical scenario, fixed systems fail to extinguish a hazard putting the entire response on human and mobile hardware resources. This would include but is not limited to firetrucks, mobile high-flow pumping systems, large mobile monitors, foam proportioning units, and large diameter layflat hose. This type of response escalates into a larger scale operation, sometimes involving agencies beyond the facility operator itself. Although a low probability event, the risk to life and property is significantly substantial. Fixed systems may be rendered inoperable due to the loss of electrical power or actual physical damage Reducing fire-related expenditureMore typical than the worst-case scenario, facilities experience both maintenance-related system downtimes and natural phenomena damage such as extreme weather and seismic events. In this case, fixed systems may be rendered inoperable due to the loss of electrical power or actual physical damage. In any of these situations, mobile fire apparatus may fill the gap requirements of the facility as their flexible storage and deployment would protect them from everything but the worst natural disasters. Their further benefit is that a smaller set of mobile apparatus resources may be used to protect a larger amount of infrastructure, especially while in use in a mutual-aid program between facilities and communities. According to the NFPA’s report “Total Cost of Fire in the United States”, fire-related damages and expenditures from 1980 to 2014 have risen from roughly $200B (adjusted for inflation to 2014) to nearly $330B. The greatest expenditure is in fire safety costs in building construction, amounting to $57.4B. Although the overall losses per year as a ratio to protection expenditures has dropped by roughly 70% over the past 30 years, petrochemical facility losses have continued to rise over the same time. In the worst-case petrochemical scenario, fixed systems fail to extinguish a hazard  Petrochemical facility challenges According to the NFPA, refineries or natural gas plants had reported an average of 228 fires or explosions per year through the 1990s. Furthering this data with Marsh’s “100 Largest Losses, 25th edition”, refinery losses have continually expanded throughout the last two decades with 11 of the top 20 largest losses of the past 40 years happening during or after the year 2000. Two primary drivers of this trend are the advanced age of petrochemical facilities and their staggering complexity. As oil margins fall, upstream operational businesses are detrimentally affected by reduced investment in everything to new equipment, maintenance and passive safety systems. There is an observable correlation between a major oil price drop followed by upstream facility fire losses. Even with reduced investment and oil throughput growth rates, US refinery utilisation at the end 2017 was at 96.7%, the highest since 2005 (Marsh, The Impact of the Price of Oil). The short story is that systems and personnel are being asked to do more with less with each passing year. Cost-effective mobile apparatus systems  Mobile fire apparatus is generally more cost-effective to procure when using standardised designs and application methodology. They can access open water sources by either drafting (when in close proximity to the water) or using floating source pumps (for variable level or difficult access water sources). Mobile fire apparatus is generally more cost-effective to procure when using standardized designs and application methodology With this open water access, they can provide significantly more water (upwards of 10,000 GPM or more per system if necessary) than any typical fixed fire pumping solution. Moreover, as their primary benefit, they are easy to move and deploy. This benefit allows them to be utilised at the point of hazard as needed while being easily accessible for service. While fixed systems are installed at “every known” hazard and must be continually maintained to operate effectively, mobile systems may be used sitewide or across facilities. This flexibility reduces overall capital expenditure requirements and establishes a valuable primary and secondary firefighting system depending on the hazard and facility resources. Combining fixed and mobile systems Permanent installation fire suppression systems are a mainstay of modern day firefighting. They provide immediate passive response with little human intervention. However, as facility utilisation is pushed to maximum capacity while fixed systems continually age out without adequate replacement or maintenance, mobile systems will need to both fill the response gap and provide a final wall to total loss incidents. The reality is that both fixed and mobile systems need to work together to provide the safest possible operation. Service and training requirements need to also be maintained to manage an adequate, or even better, exemplary response to hazard control incidents. Managing major facility uptime requires continuous oversight and to drive hazard mitigation standards throughout the organisation, including executive management. A safe, reliable and fully-functional plant is also a profitable and cost-effective plant much like a healthy worker is a better worker. Protect your people and property and you will protecting your company’s future.

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Emergency One Provides Fire Training With Leader Equipment
Emergency One Provides Fire Training With Leader Equipment

Specially designed for fire safety trainers, the LEADER range of fire training equipment can be used to organize particularly realistic and dynamic fire training. Any company firefighting policy would be incomplete without training on what to do in the event of a fire. For over 20-year, LEADER has designed and manufactured fire training equipment like flame generators which perfectly meets the training requirements of any company’s fire safety officers, whilst respecting the environment, health, and learner safety requirements. Leader is one of the forerunners in the design and manufacture of propane gas-supplied fire extinguisher trainers. A fire trainer/flame generator that allows for the reduction of the impact on the environment, whilst reproducing intense and realistic fires with a flame height of up to 3m. Training Modules To personalize training and familiarize learners with all fire situations, LEADER has designed training modules compatible with all fire trainers (also called flame generators). These modules can simulate specific situations such as: Computer screen fires Bin fires Power cabinet fires Motor fires Aerosol explosions LEADER fire training modules allows learners to: Recognize the type of fire (Class, A, B, C, D, or F fire) Select the correct extinguisher (spray water extinguisher, water + additive, powder, CO2, or foam) Use the correct technique to extinguish the fire (spraying extinguishing agent over the fire, covering the fire with a wet cloth, etc.) Equipment Range LEADER fire training equipment range perfectly meets the needs of fire training for any company staff In order to supplement the fire training equipment range, Leader, the well-known fire training equipment supplier, also offers different types of refillable extinguishes for fire extinguisher training; (auxiliary pressure extinguisher, permanent pressure extinguish, CO2 extinguisher). LEADER also supplies smoke generators able to create realistic smoke for safe evacuation exercises and training. The LEADER fire training equipment range perfectly meets the needs of fire training for any company staff while respecting the environment and health and safety requirements. Totally autonomous and supplied by a rechargeable 12v battery, the environmentally friendly flame simulator can be used for training without polluting or leaving residue on-site (ash, non-consumer hydrocarbons). There is no need to add wood, hydrocarbons, or other fuels to the fire. Specific Products Fire Trainer / Flame Generator Pyros 3 Pyros 3, the most powerful fire trainer in the range, produces very powerful flames (up to 3 meters high) and high thermal radiation for realistic and impressive training. For safe training, closer to the trainee, the fire trainer is equipped with a control panel and remote controls for perfect control of the fire (ignition, extinction, and flame height) and control of the gas supply. The water in the pan allows a homogenous distribution of the fire on all the surface of the pan giving it a strong thermal radiation with flames rising up to 3m high. PYROS 3, the largest flame generator in the range, has a very large fire surface area of 0.83m2. PYROS fire trainer is well-equipped to be able to carry out training with full safety: Two remote controls supplied for controlling the fire (ignition and extinction) at distance. A handy wireless remote control to accompany the trainee towards the fire, without cable and wired remote control. Integrated solenoid valve for automatic and immediate gas control Emergency stop button located on the console PYROS 3 fire trainer has been specifically designed for ease of use: Easy drainage ensured by handles for secure handling of the pan and wheels that allow the pan to be moved easily and titled effortlessly Storage space next to the igniter for the wired and wireless remote controls Storage space under the console to accommodate a bottle of gas PYROS 3 fire trainers is equipped with a control console: Lightweight and stable. Easy to transport: store in the pan during transport Control of flame height with 2 gas supply taps and 1 flow rate adjuster 1 pressure gauge for continuous gas pressure monitoring 1 emergency stop button Possible to connect 1 to 2 bottles of industrial-type propane gas or 4 bottles of domestic gas Fire Trainer / Flame Generator AEROS 2 The AEROS 2 fire trainer is the ideal compromise between the power of PYROS 3 and the compactness of GF42. With a fire surface area of 0.50m2, it generates flames of 1.50m high. Compact and lightweight, it is easily transportable. With a weight of 20.8 Kg, AEROS 2 fire trainer is easily transportable. The water in the pan allows a homogenous distribution of the fire on all the surface of the pan creating an impressive oil-slick fire effect with flames rising to 1.50m high. AEROS 2 is equipped with a wired remote control for controlling the fire (ignition and extinction) at distance. In addition, the fire trainer has an integrated solenoid valve for automatic and instantaneous gas control. AEROS 2 flame generator has been specially designed for ease of use: Easy drainage thanks to the flame generator tilting legs Increased ground contact surfaces areas, allowing it to be used on soft ground Fire Trainer / Flame Generator GF42 Compact, lightweight, the GF42 fire trainer is easy to carry in a vehicle. Water-free, it is simple and quick to set up. With a fire surface of 0.42m2, it generates flames with a maximum height of 1.20m. The GF42 is 63cm wide and 70cm long and weighs 14.3kg, allowing it to be easily transported and stored in a car boot. Fire training without water, the GF42 requires no preparation before use, no water filling necessary.

Emergency One (UK) Limited Launch the E1 Scorpion™
Emergency One (UK) Limited Launch the E1 Scorpion™

This February saw the launch of Emergency One (UK) Limited’s (E1) flagship new appliance, the E1 Scorpion™ The event, hosted by E1 and sister company, Clan Tools and Plant Limited, at their state-of-the-art specialist appliance manufacturing plant in Scotland, welcomed attendees from Fire and Rescue Services throughout the UK, as well as many from the airport and industrial FRS. E1 has been at the forefront of specialist vehicle design and manufacture in the UK for 30 years, and they are now the largest such company based in the UK. Many of their developments have become widely adopted and recognized as the industry standards. Through detailed engagement with the UK FRS’s, dedicated research and development, collaborative engineering, and a passion for innovation, the E1 Scorpion™ was born Innovate and Evolve While the E1 Scorpion™ concept is not new (water tower pumping appliances have been around for decades), the manufacturing and systems engineering and technology employed with this vehicle certainly are new. The E1 Engineering and Design Project Team were issued with the following simple design brief: Improve firefighter and public safety Robust and reliable engineering Full BS EN 1846 compliance / Full pumping appliance capability Full water tower capability / High flow rates / Optimize monitor performance Offer Choice – Full customization of build and chassis options Develop and improve existing technologies and solutions Simplify operation The resultant development of the E1 Scorpion™, therefore, required the creation of many new and innovative systems and componentry, as well as the refinement of many existing technologies – all of which were also on display at the Launch event. HRET System 20m High Reach Extendable Turret (HRET) system is installed featuring the Fire-Spike piercing lance system A 20m High Reach Extendable Turret (HRET) system is installed (designed and manufactured in England by E1 UK partner Translink International), featuring the “Fire-Spike” piercing lance system. The installation facilitates up to a 20m vertical reach and 14m horizontal reach, with full 360° rotation. Water and Foam delivery is available via the boom-mounted high flow monitor (up to 6,000lpm), or via the “Fire-Spike” (1,000lpm). CCTV and Thermal Imaging Cameras are also installed, with images relayed to locations such as the cab or pump bay system controls and/or the chest-pack remote control system. Fire Engineering Installation The impressive Fire Engineering installation feature a Godiva Prima P6A pump (6,000lpm), along with an (optional) Cobra Ultra High-Pressure abrasive/cutting system. The pump features a custom E1 designed manifold system, facilitating the high flow characteristics of the appliance. Full BS EN 1846 Pumping Appliance capability is upheld, with the appliance featuring a 6-person cab/crew cab, individual crew seats (c/w integrated BA), a 1,800-liter water tank, 100-liter foam tank, and a 1,200kg operational equipment inventory capacity. A unique (optional) pump bay canopy door provides safe shelter for the pump operator, who benefits from the latest widescreen version (“Evo”) of the industry-standard E1 “ePumpControl” HMI system. Design and Functions The rear body superstructure includes the all-new “E-1” Roller Shutter Door system, and “E-1 Streamline” smooth, flush-sided profile – with no overhanging door furniture (a narrower body and reduced accident damage potential). The E1 Technology arm of the business was on the show, with the E1 Scorpion featuring the latest iterations of their “e1fleet” specialist appliance telematics system, the “e1Tag” Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) on-appliance asset management system, and the “e1Connect” mobile Wi-Fi hotspot. To enhance the list of firefighting options available only from E1, the “E1 Nebula” system was also launched. The Ultra High-Pressure firefighting system (38lpm @ 200bar) includes several lance options, robust PTO drive (low maintenance, improved reliability, and performance), full integration with ePumpControl, and e1fleet, and options for foam and abrasive cutting upgrades. The system was demonstrated in its alternative, portable (self-contained) form. Other product launched Also unveiled was the E1 Scorpion’s™ big brother, the E1 Manticore™; a fully configurable industrial appliance, available on 18, 26 or 32 tons GVW Chassis Day/Crew Cab variants. Authority Comment E1 Scorpion™ showcases the best of British engineering, innovation, and manufacturing Mike Madsen, Managing Director, Emergency One (UK) Limited and Clan Tools & Plant Limited, commented; “We are delighted that the E1 Scorpion™ has been met with such enthusiasm. It’s important to me that we offer our customers choice – hence the E1 Scorpion is fully customizable and offers a unique, no-compromise build solution along with a comprehensive option list.” “The build quality and truly innovative design features are testaments to the quality, passion, drive, and commitment of our employees and the collaborative approach we adopted throughout the design and manufacture process. Working closely with our partners in Manchester, Translink International, I am proud that the E1 Scorpion™ showcases the best of British engineering, innovation, and manufacturing.” Finally, key supplier partners on the E1 Scorpion™ project were on hand to discuss and display their own products, along with many of the E1 and Clan Partner Companies, such as Magirus, Lukas, Vetter, Leader, and BioEx.

Emergency One Provides Leader Sentry Movement Monitor
Emergency One Provides Leader Sentry Movement Monitor

On the 22nd December 2010, a routine operation took a dramatic turn for firefighters in Chicago, Illinois. Two of them died and 14 others were seriously injured after the collapse of a burning building. For many years this peril has always faced Fire & Rescue teams and even since this accident many others have occurred around the world. To help prevent such accidents, there is a simple and effective solution that monitors the movements of a structure and alerts rescue teams of an imminent risk of collapse or danger. Designed by LEADER in collaboration with international experts in USAR and victim location techniques, LEADER Sentry provides additional safety in operational areas where teams or crews may be working, including rescue teams, firefighters, doctors, workers, and other persons or victims. Design and Features LEADER Sentry monitors the stability of buildings during firefighting operations With a simple program setting, the harmless laser ray of the LEADER Sentry monitors for the slightest movement in a structure or mass that may endanger people: unstable building, vehicle accident, landslide, rockfall, snow shift, or avalanche. Two LEADER Sentry laser sensors can be linked simultaneously to monitor two different structures or two axis of movement of the same structure. If the movement of the structure under surveillance exceeds the warning threshold chosen, a powerful siren and a flashing beacon are activated to warn of an impending collapse allowing rescuers to take refuge or evacuation measures. LEADER Sentry monitors the stability: of buildings during firefighting operations (fire damaged metal structures, wooden houses or other buildings, post-incident) during operations of USAR – Searching for victims (after a collapse or natural disaster) during the work/inspections within dangerous underground structures (Sewers, tunnels, mines….) during emergency shoring and securing trenches and structures (Trenches, shorings…) during securing of fragile structures (snow on the roof of houses or stadium….) or dangerously unstable masses (cliffs, archaeological excavations landslides of dangerous rocks, felled tree…) of wreckage during Rescue following Road traffic accidents, Railway derailments (lifting of damaged vehicles (trucks, train…) or of structures during operations of road rescue (movement or collapse of a bridge or a road structure) Strengths of the product Simple and intuitive One or two laser heads can be plugged into the same control box to be used simultaneously A laser beam with a range of 30 meters (100 feet) A 98 dB alarm and a red flashing beacon for immediate warnings of possible dangers Quick and easy programming Selectable adjustment by increments from 5 to 100 mm (0.2” to 4”) to determine the acceptable maximum threshold of movement depending on the structure and context A clear display showing movement in real-time with the choice of measurement (meters or inches) Possibility of multi-source power to be operational in all situations Automatic switchover to AA batteries back up if the main power source fails A telescopic sight enabling precise pinpointing of the laser on the targeted area

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