Browse Fire Protection Suits

Protective Suits - Expert Commentary

A Changing Time: The Evolution Of Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment
A Changing Time: The Evolution Of Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment

Firefighting is hot, hazardous, and let's face it, grueling work. But believe it or not, the job today has become even more challenging as firefighters must deal with increased heat loads, toxic substances and other physical challenges that make structural firefighting one of the most demanding professions on the planet. So, needless to say, being well-trained, physically fit, and safely equipped can make all the difference in the world. Evolving Technology The fact is, as heat loads and toxicity exposure risks increase due to modern synthetic construction, the ways in which fires are fought are changing as well. These shifts, combined with the revolution that’s taking place in firefighter protection technology, have led to new and exciting designs in firefighter personal protective equipment (PPE) offerings. Technology is providing firefighters with respiratory protection “systems” is which respiratory protection itself is just one of many benefits Take the tried and true SCBA for instance. Since the invention of the first breathing apparatus in the late 1910s, their primary function has been air delivery. But today, technology is providing firefighters with respiratory protection “systems” is which respiratory protection itself is just one of many benefits. Revolution Of Life-Changing Technology Consider this: the effects of technology today impact virtually every aspect of modern life. And the same is true for the fire service, as software, thermal imaging, and wireless communications capabilities become more mainstream on the fireground. In response to these new capabilities, the consensus organizations responsible for PPE performance standards (i.e. NFPA and EN) have increased standards by mandating certain electronic components for each firefighter. But performance of these components can be limited by the fact that only so many “parts” can be attached to an SCBA, or because some capabilities are simply out of reach from a budget perspective. Over time, these limitations create long-term implications when it comes to SCBA choice, because the breathing apparatus purchased today may have to be in use for the next 15 years or more. So, what are firefighters to do? Firefighters should view their SCBA as the “foundation” of a safety system that equips firefighters with the many new safety capabilities that technology offers—now and in the future It’s More Than Air Delivery Missed opportunities for more timely safety improvements – which keep up with the pace of technology – are rooted in a false assumption that all SCBA are comprised of separate, mechanical components – and that the SCBA function is only about respiratory protection. But air-delivery is not the issue because every SCBA meets the standards, and every SCBA delivers air well. Further, looking at the SCBA merely as a separate component for air diminishes its potential to serve as a revolutionary safety technology “platform.” Safety As A System Firefighters need more than the minimum performance from breathing apparatus To keep pace with the rapid improvements in firefighter safety, firefighters need more than the minimum performance from breathing apparatus. Instead, they should view their SCBA as the “foundation” of a safety system that equips firefighters with the many new safety capabilities that technology offers—now and in the future. I’m talking specifically about platform-type products that can be easily updated with the latest technology, as soon as it becomes available, to help protect them when their lives are on the line. Key Questions To Consider When Looking For An SCBA Include: Does the SCBA have features that allow you to see, hear, and react quickly to changing situations? Can the SCBA sizing be customized to best fit each firefighter? How many total batteries are needed for the SCBA, and how does that affect long-term costs? How well does it integrate with other systems, such as communication devices, portable instruments, etc.? Does the SCBA provide you, your team, and incident command with critical information to make effective, life-saving decisions? Can the SCBA be programmed to meet your standard operating procedures, such as audible and visual alarms at 50% remaining pressure? Is the facepiece reducing or adding to overall SCBA cost and complexity? How easily can the SCBA be updated to meet changing standards? How easily can integrated accessories or features, such as thermal imaging, be added as they are developed in the future? At MSA, we develop technologically-advanced safety equipment designed to help meet today's changing fireground dynamics. We’re committed to setting the pace for safety with continuous improvements and innovations in PPE. For today. For tomorrow. For the future.

The Need For Emergency-Readiness With Chemical Protective Equipment
The Need For Emergency-Readiness With Chemical Protective Equipment

Having the proper fire safety and chemical-protective equipment is imperative where risk of hazardous chemical exposure is great With businesses still facing the effects of the economic crisis with budget cuts, safety remains a key concern when it comes to finding cost-effective solutions without compromising public safety. One type of incident which many businesses are not properly equipped for is hazardous chemical exposure. Ian Hutcheson of Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics highlights the importance of having the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) necessary for chemical protection and states that such preventative measures can be achieved, even with budget restrictions. While the full-scale media hype about the "Global Financial Crisis" may be behind us, the follow on effects, such as continued tight budgets and reductions in government spending, are here to stay for the foreseeable future. The UK Government recently announced a major spending review with the aim of saving £83 billion over four years. As part of this, 192 QUANGOs will be abolished including Firebuy, the professional buying organisation for the Fire and Rescue Services. This focus on decreased spending means that now, more than ever, departmental budgets are being stretched and every purchase highly scrutinised to ensure the best possible cost efficiencies are achieved. But it is essential that a reduction in spending does not negatively affect public safety. Challenges for Fire and Rescue Services in responding to hazardous chemical exposure Recently, the UK's Audit Commission released a report entitled Business Continuity in the Fire and Rescue Services which investigated the plans the Services currently have in place to ensure that public safety can be upheld during short- and long- term disruptions (such as those caused by transport problems or adverse weather). Overall, the report found that many fire and rescue services have good business continuity management plans, but they cannot cope with every situation indefinitely. Fortunately, chemical incidents are infrequent but it is paramount that public safety is given priority and maintaining a robust, compliant arsenal of chemical-resistant personal protective equipment is essential to being readily equipped for an emergency situation.One area of particular concern was that, during these periods of disruption, less than a third of all Fire and Rescue Services could guarantee the availability of the sophisticated fire safety equipment needed in cases of hazardous chemical exposure.Advances are being made in the development of chemical-protective equipment Chemical protective suits reflect advancements in PPE There is, however, some good news for both the concerned public and those with stretched departmental budgets: advances are being made in the development of chemical-protective equipment that both improve quality and decrease total costs. This means that more Fire and Rescue Services will be able to fit equipment essential to chemical protection into their tight budgets. One such advancement is the availability of limited-life chemical-protective suits. These suits meet safety standards and fit the same application areas as their reusable counterparts, but offer both a smaller upfront purchase price and reduced total cost of ownership. These lower costs are achieved through minimal recertification, inspection, maintenance and storage expenses. Hopefully, decision makers will embrace the advances in chemical-protective equipment to ensure our fire services are readily equipped for all emergency situations. Ian Hutcheson - Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics

Latest Lion Apparel, Inc. news

Ballyclare Acquires Lion Firefighter Business In The UK
Ballyclare Acquires Lion Firefighter Business In The UK

The acquisition consolidates Ballyclare’s position as provider of firefighter protection in the UK Ballyclare Limited is pleased to announce that it has acquired the Lion firefighter business in the UK from the LHD Group. Ballyclare is owned by David Ross, the entrepreneur who made his name with the success of Carphone Warehouse. Speaking of Ballyclare’s latest move, Mr Ross said: “This is an important move for Ballyclare. It consolidates our position as a leading provider of firefighter protection in the UK and gives us an excellent base to build a broader protective clothing business”. Speaking of his plans for merging Lion and Ballyclare Carlton Greener, Managing Director of Ballyclare, said: “Ballyclare and Lion are both well-known brands with a high reputation for service and product quality. Our objective will be to combine the best of both businesses to create a new and stronger Ballyclare”. Lion was established in the UK 15 years ago by Lion Apparel from Dayton Ohio. Ownership was later transferred to the German LHD Group, before being acquired by Ballyclare. Ballyclare was acquired by David Ross in March 2013.

New York Fire Department Gears Up With  Lion’s MT94 CBRN To Tackle Chemical, Biological And WMD Hazards
New York Fire Department Gears Up With Lion’s MT94 CBRN To Tackle Chemical, Biological And WMD Hazards

New York fire department is set to face all hazards equipped with the new protective suit from Lion Apparel  The protective suit advancements will significantly improve safety and decrease the physical impact on New York's Fire Department  first responders. Fire departments around the world are evaluating their operational readiness to respond to hazmat incidents. The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) city, the largest fire department in the United States, has taken the lead in upgrading its response protocol by improving its ability to respond against chemical, biological and WMD incidents. The advancements will significantly improve safety and decrease the physical impact on FDNY's first responders. As part of the upgrade to its chemical protective clothing program, the FDNY has selected Lion's MT94 CBRN protective ensemble to fit its mission-specific needs and increase its response capabilities for technical rescue, patient rescue, decontamination and air monitoring. The revamped program provides FDNY's hazmat response teams with a more functional alternative than wearing traditional Level A suits to respond to such incidents. Lion's MT94 is a one-piece ensemble designed to protect against some of the world's deadliest chemical and biological threats. It combines rugged GORE® CHEMPAK® Ultra Barrier Fabric laminated to a tough Nomex® outer textile to offer lightweight and comfortable multi-wear, multi-threat protection. The MT94 is certified to NFPA 1994, Class 2 and NFPA 1992. Providing the highest level of protection in a Class 2 suit, the MT94 helps block out high levels of CBRN agents that may be encountered in the "hot zone."

IFRM Sends Donated Gear To Papua New Guinea
IFRM Sends Donated Gear To Papua New Guinea

The IFRM has sent donated firefighter gear to a Papua New Guinea fire dept. IFRM sends equipment donated by fire departments across US In late June, the International Fire Relief Mission (IFRM) sent one pallet of donated fire and EMS equipment to the Ukarumpa Fire Department in Papua New Guinea. Later this year, IFRM will send a team of fire and EMS professionals to train members of the fire department on the safe and proper use of the equipment. IFRM is a nonprofit organization that collects used fire and EMS equipment and delivers it to needy fire departments in developing nations.The equipment was generously donated by fire departments across the United States, with most of it coming from fire departments in Minnesota and the U.S. Air Force base in Duluth, Iowa. The majority of the equipment shipped was turnout gear, aircraft rescue and firefighting gear, and SCBA air packs and masks. IFRM also sent first-responder equipment such as AED units and CPR training dummies. "In their letter to us, Ukarumpa's fire chief said the department was operating without any SCBA, boots, helmets or gloves," said Ron Gruening, IFRM president. Gruening is a retired paramedic and an active volunteer firefighter. "When a department asks us for help, we assess its greatest needs and fill those to the best of our ability. We sometimes take for granted how good we have it here in the United States. But often, fire and EMS equipment that no longer meets U.S. regulatory requirements is a profound upgrade to what many firefighters in developing nations are using today. This equipment immediately makes the firefighters' jobs safer and improves their chances of saving civilian lives. What may seem like a simple act of recycling to us dramatically changes their lives."Later this year, Gruening and his team will spend two weeks in Papua New Guinea teaching the Ukarumpa firefighters how to safely and effectively use the newly donated gear. IFRM is preparing other shipments to Roatan, Peru, and Bolivia. Those shipments also will be accompanied by on-the-ground training. "This global recession has made the need for fire and EMS gear greater than ever," Gruening said. "But through the generous support of American fire departments and our corporate partners like Rosenbauer, FRC, Lion Apparel, and GearGrid, we've been able to help those who risk their lives helping others."

vfd