INTERSCHUTZ 2015 covers all aspects that are relevant to the four key themes of INTERSCHUTZ 2015
Once again, the number of exhibitors from abroad will exceed the number of German exhibitors

From 8 to 13 June, everyone who plays in role in the world of fire prevention, disaster relief, rescue and safety & security will be meeting up at INTERSCHUTZ in Hannover, Germany. Some 1,500 exhibitors, including around 800 from 51 countries apart from Germany, will be showcasing their products and services to visitors from around the world. “In partnership with the German Fire Protection Association (vfdb), the German Fire Service Association (DFV) and the German Engineering Federation (VDMA), we will be offering what must be the world’s most comprehensive mix of commercial and non-commercial exhibitors,” explains Dr. Jochen Köckler, the member of the Managing Board at Deutsche Messe in charge of INTERSCHUTZ. “This unique mix provides the foundation for an INTERSCHUTZ that is shaping up to be both a pace-setting high-tech show and an unforgettable get-together for everyone involved in fire prevention and rescue work. We will be seeing the latest trends in security and safety technology in Hannover, including fourth industrial revolution concepts with self-optimisation and self-configuration solutions that enable ever more complex tasks to be performed, such as those needed to safeguard critical infrastructure. The unique program also features exciting competitions, presentations that are both impressive and informative, and highly interesting symposia, conferences and sector-specific hubs.”

Fire services ready and willing to invest

The German Engineering Federation (VDMA), which represents some 30 leading companies in the fire protection technology sector with a total of some 4,000 employees, expects INTERSCHUTZ – which is held every five years as the sector’s flagship fair – to give the industry a significant boost. “The joint decision to stage the fair in Hannover in the coming decade was a smart move,” said Dr. Bernd Scherer, Managing Director of VDMA. “Nowhere else offers a comparable infrastructure.” The slogan “Destination: future!” is significant for the industry association in two respects, with fire services in Germany having shown a huge willingness to invest during the current financial year. “Overall we’re expecting a further increase of six percent in 2015,” predicts Scherer. “The overall mood is positive throughout the industry.” The healthy development in the export markets seen over the past year, particularly in South East Europe and parts of East Asia, is also set to continue.

INTERSCHUTZ as a global magnet

The fact that, for example, the export quota among vehicle manufacturers represented by VDMA has recently increased to around a third of the production volume is reflected by the high level of interest that INTERSCHUTZ 2015 is attracting worldwide as a marketing platform for safety and security technology. Once again, the number of exhibitors from abroad will exceed the number of German exhibitors, impressively underlining the great international importance of INTERSCHUTZ. China will be the most strongly represented this year, while Italy, France and Poland will be sharing their expertise at the Partner Country Days, which are debuting in 2015. The USA, the Netherlands, Austria, the Czech Republic and Turkey will also be strongly represented at INTERSCHUTZ and, along with the other nations, will help make INTERSCHUTZ 2015 the biggest and most international yet.

Unique array of topics fully addressed thanks to huge showgrounds and dedicated knowledge-sharing platforms

With a total area of over 106,000 square meters, INTERSCHUTZ 2015 covers all aspects that are relevant to the four key themes of INTERSCHUTZ 2015: fire prevention, disaster relief, rescue and safety & security. INTERSCHUTZ is not only characterised by its huge exhibition grounds, but also be numerous ways of picking up valuable know-how. To give just a few examples: the two-day 17th edition of the Hannoversche Notfallsymposium, which is organised by the Johanniter Academy Training Institute in Hannover in collaboration with the Hannover Medical School (MHH), offers a varied and interesting program featuring practice-based workshops. The international forum CRI!SE is dedicated to the key topic Critical Infrastructure, with the new sector-specific hubs Preventive Fire Protection, Safety & Security with CRI!SE and Rescue & Disaster Relief enabling visitors to talk directly to key players in the sectors and to gather information first hand.

Spectacular supporting program offers information and excitement for visitors

“The spectacular demonstrations in the halls and on the INTERSCHUTZ open-air and demonstration sites in parallel with contests for coveted awards such as Toughest Firefighter Alive and Best Rope Rescuer create a fascinating program to put professionals and interested visitors in close touch,” added Köckler. “We work with our partners to achieve the right balance of business, information and communication – not least because fascination can lead to valuable support for the demanding work undertaken by rescuers.” INTERSCHUTZ will also host the presentation of the Hans Dietrich Genscher Award, which honours individuals for their exceptional contributions to saving lives. In cooperation with the Hannover Tramway Museum and the Holmatro Rescue Experience, the Vintage Fire Engine Show – an exciting mix of competition and entertainment in which 29 rescue teams from 16 countries demonstrate their skills in realistic vehicle rescue scenarios – will also help make INTERSCHUTZ 2015 an unforgettable experience for all concerned.

Deutsche Messe AG

With revenue of 280 million euros (2014), Deutsche Messe AG ranks among the world’s ten largest trade fair companies and operates the world’s largest exhibition center. In 2014, Deutsche Messe planned and staged 134 trade fairs and congresses around the world – events which hosted a total of over 41,000 exhibitors and some 3.6 million visitors. The company’s event portfolio includes such world-leading trade fairs as CeBIT (IT and telecommunications), HANNOVER MESSE (industrial technology), BIOTECHNICA (biotechnology), CeMAT (intralogistics), didacta (education), DOMOTEX (floor coverings), INTERSCHUTZ (fire prevention and rescue), and LIGNA (wood processing and forestry). With approx. 1,200 employees and a network of 66 representatives, subsidiaries and branch offices, Deutsche Messe is present in more than 100 countries worldwide.

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