Extinguishers - Expert Commentary

Brexit And Fire Safety: What Will Change, And What Won’t?
Brexit And Fire Safety: What Will Change, And What Won’t?

After years of Brexit negotiations and an ongoing climate of prevailing uncertainty, businesses across the UK are still adjusting to the realities of life outside the European Union. Following the end of the UK’s transition period with the European Union, at the end of last year, the United Kingdom is no longer subject to European laws. However, for many companies, the last-minute nature of the Brexit negotiations mean that they remain unclear on what has actually changed in practical terms, particularly with regard to the day-to-day rules and regulations that govern how they do business. Post-Brexit workplace safety rules Workplace safety rules are likely to be a major source of questions in many cases Workplace safety rules are likely to be a major source of questions in many cases. Have any rules changed as a result of Brexit? Do any of the fire safety standards that were previously in place need to be amended now that EU standards no longer apply in the UK? And is it likely that the UK’s fire safety laws might change in the near future, to reflect the country’s newfound legislative independence? Here, we will explore the answers to these questions, in order to provide you and your business with an insight into what aspects of fire safety might change due to Brexit - and what elements are almost certain to remain the same. What has already changed? In truth, the reality is that so far, very little has changed in terms of how workplace safety regulations are implemented and enforced in the United Kingdom. Although many of the current rules around occupational safety and fire prevention were previously derived from EU directives, the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 has since transposed all of those regulations into UK law, in order to provide as much legal continuity for businesses and communities as possible. Amendments to the supply of new work equipment By enshrining these former EU rules as UK law, the British government is now able to enforce them directly, as well as gaining the ability to adapt or remove them unilaterally in the future. Thus far, the most notable change affecting fire safety standards are the amendments to the manufacture and supply of new work equipment, which have altered the processes that are involved in certifying the safety and quality of equipment, which are used in the workplace. UK-specific UKCA standard Post-Brexit, newly-manufactured equipment will be tested and marked as per new UK-specific UKCA standard Previously, any gear purchased for workplace use needed to bear European CE marking to affirm its conformity to international standards. However, post-Brexit, newly-manufactured equipment will be tested and marked according to the new UK-specific UKCA standard instead. In practice, the impact of this change will not be significant for the time being. Products that conform to relevant European product supply legislation and correctly bear the CE marking will be treated as satisfying the requirements of the relevant UK legislation, until December 31st 2021, and will therefore not require UK marking. This is only likely to change after this date, if future regulatory evolution causes the UKCA and CE standards to diverge. What might change in future? At present, the vast majority of UK legislation on fire prevention and general workplace health and safety, remains in close alignment with EU standards, partly in order to maintain an international consensus on best practice, and to facilitate economic cooperation. However, the stated purpose of Brexit was to provide the UK government with scope to amend and create its own standards and regulations, and as time goes by, it becomes more likely that we will see increasingly significant changes to how fire safety is regulated. For example, in recent months the government has pledged to make a number of updates to the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, following a series of inquiries and consultations prompted by the Grenfell Tower fire of 2017. The proposed move could usher in the following changes for all regulated buildings in England, both residential and commercial: When carrying out a fire risk assessment, there will be a new requirement for any person engaged by the responsible person (RP) to undertake any part of the assessment to demonstrate competence. RPs will be required to record their completed fire risk assessments, and the identification of RPs will also be recorded. Penalties for failure to comply with fire safety regulations will increase. Steps will be taken to improve the effectiveness of consultation between building control bodies and fire and rescue authorities on planning for building work, as well as for arranging the handover of fire safety information. As such, businesses should be keeping a close eye on any moves by the government to update its approach to fire safety regulations, and make sure they are ready to make these changes as and when they are needed. What will remain the same? The UK has always been committed to maintaining high standards when it comes to fire safety Although a certain amount of regulatory change is to be expected in a post-Brexit UK, it is also important for businesses to be realistic about what is always likely to stay the same. The UK has always been committed to maintaining high standards when it comes to fire safety, and there is no reason for any organization to allow these standards to slip in the wake of Brexit. No matter what happens in future, you will always be expected to fulfill the following responsibilities: Carry out regular fire safety risk assessments to identify potential fire hazards within your workplace, and then create a plan to eliminate, minimize or manage these risks. Make sure your workplace is properly equipped with fire detection systems and equipment, and maintain them regularly to keep them in proper working order. Keep your fire exits and escape routes clearly marked, well-lit and unobstructed at all times. Invest in fire extinguishers, fire blankets and other equipment to ensure you are able to contain any fires that break out. Provide appropriate training for all of your staff on procedures they should follow in case of fire, including fire drills, as well as getting their buy-in to create a company culture where fire risks are managed and dealt with proactively. Political circumstances may change, but the core principles of workplace fire safety will always remain the same. As such, the best way to ensure your business is properly equipped for the future is to hold fast to these timeless principles, using them as a foundation for future changes and advances as the reality of post-Brexit trading slowly takes shape.

Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants
Fire Protection For Paper And Pulp Plants

There is a sense in some markets that the paper and pulp industry will decline owing to the digital technologies with which people interact every day. While this might be considered logical, the reality is completely different. In fact, the paper and pulp industry has experienced a steady growth and will continue to do so in 2021. Production of paper increased by more than 450% in the last decades and the demand of paperboard in the world is expected to grow significantly, driven by e-commerce and big retailers increasing their presence in the online sales universe. This sustained growth in production capacity and paper consumption presents several fire risks to companies and exposes communities that develop around paper mills, to the impact of disasters caused by these fire risks. Fire risks in the paper and pulp industry Paper and cardboard are combustible, but this is not the only fire risk found in these types of industries. Raw materials and finished goods storage are sensitive to fire. In addition, the paper making process includes several stages where fires can occur, due to hot surfaces or poor ventilation. The most relevant fire risks on a paper plant are: Storage Areas: As mentioned before, paper and cardboard are combustible. Solid paper blocks and reels have hard surfaces that don’t ignite easily, but usually these reels can suffer minor damages or have loose sheets that significantly increase the fire risk. When paper reels are stacked in columns, gaps in the center can act as chimneys and when fires start in the bottom of the stack, this chimney effect will accelerate smoke and hot air spread, increasing vertical and horizontal flame spread. Wood and Bale storage fire risks Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present Raw materials for the paper making process can have two main sources, forestry products (mainly wood) or recycled cardboard and paper. Wood storage presents several challenges, especially due to wood chips that are highly combustible and, in some cases, even explosive. Bale storage also presents a high fire risk, as loose materials are always present. Fire in baled paper is difficult to extinguish and generates heavy smoke. In many recycling facilities, these paper bales are stored outdoors, where paper or rags soaked in flammable liquids, embedded between the paper sheets, can ignite resulting in a fast spreading fire. Chemicals, flammable liquids and gases In addition, it is possible to find different types of chemicals, flammable liquids and gases that are used in the paper making process. These materials have their own fire-related risks that need to be taken in consideration. Production Areas: In pulp factories, there are several long-distance conveyors that transport wood and wood chips. These conveyors constitute a fire risk and the most probable causes of fire are bearing damage, overheating of the conveyor and igniting chips in the environment. IR dryers, a common source of fire After the wood has been transported, chipped and digested, the paper making process becomes extremely humid, due to the large amounts of hot water and steam needed. But, as soon as the pulp fiber sheet starts to dry, the hot surfaces in contact with the paper sheets can be a source of ignition. IR dryers used in the process are also a common source of fire in the paper industry. When the sheet of paper is formed, close contact with reels and bearings moving fast can create static electricity that could ignite loose paper or airborne particles. Problems like these are likely to be more extensive in tissue mills. Paper dust is generated in certain parts of the process, especially where paper shits are slit or cut. Poorly insulated steam pipes lead to fire Poorly insulated steam pipes can ignite paper dust or even their own insulation materials. In addition, paper dust gathers in the ventilation grills of machinery, causing overheating and igniting as well. Heated oil is used in several parts of the process as well and if a malfunction occurs on the Hot Oil Roll systems, leaks might occur, exposing hot surfaces to this oil and causing ignitions. A paper mill has hydraulically operated machinery, where leaks or sprays might ignite as well. Service Areas: As in many other manufacturing facilities, several service areas can be found. Electrical and network equipment rooms have an inherent fire risk due to damaged wires or equipment, overheating or short circuits in high voltage circuits. Transformer and generator areas entail fire risks as well. High fire risk for boiler rooms Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves Hot water and steam are key components for the paper making process. For this reason, paper plants use high capacity boilers that can be powered by flammable liquids or gases. A high fire risk can be considered for boiler rooms. Flammable gas distribution systems can be ignition sources, in case of leaks or damaged pipes or valves. In addition to the fire risks mentioned in these areas, many maintenance operations can also pose fire risk, especially when hot works are being performed. Sparks caused by welding or the use of certain tools can ignite paper sheets or dust in the air. Poor housekeeping and buildup of paper dust, for example, increases the risk associated with maintenance and construction works. Prevention, the first line of defense According to the Health and Safety Executive from the United Kingdom, 60% of fires on paper mills are caused by machine faults and poor housekeeping. The first line of defense to avoid fire risks in paper plants is prevention. As mentioned before, a high number of fires in these types of facilities occur because of poor housekeeping and machine malfunction. The key is to identify the risks and possible ignition sources, and apply measures to minimize them. As in many industries, fire protection has two main components: Passive and Active protection. Passive fire protection measures Passive measures include fire rated walls, ceilings, and floors in the most critical areas. Chemical storage areas should be physically separated from other dangerous areas, if this is not possible then the walls separating areas should be fire rated and materials must be stored in a way that minimizes the risk of fire spread by radiation or conduction. Proper compartmentalization and intumescent protection of structural elements should be part of the package as well. Passive measures include proper ventilation and smoke control. As mentioned before, paper dust is a major fire risk, which is why ventilation and cleaning of hoods over the paper machine is important to minimize the possibility of ignition. Fire resisting construction should be designed with the following goals in mind: Protection of escape routes Form compartments to contain fires that might occur Separate areas of higher fire risk Protect load bearing and structural members to minimize risk of collapse Sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades Active fire protection includes sprinkler systems, gas extinguishing systems and hose reels to support fire brigades. Finished goods stored indoors should be protected with sprinkler systems and the same should be considered for chemical storage areas and certain raw materials. Paper bales, ideally should be protected by sprinklers that are suitably designed to cope with the height and located, in all cases, 3 meters above the level of bales stacked vertically (which should not exceed 5 meters height). Spark detectors in hoods, pipes and ventilation systems Dangerous sparks could be generated in several parts of the paper making process, which is why spark detectors must be installed in hoods, pipes, and ventilation systems. Water spray and CO2 systems can be used to protect machinery against these risks. Means to fight fires, like extinguishers and hose reels, should be provided to support fire brigades. All the elements should be properly identified and all personnel should be trained and made aware of the location of such devices. Importance of fire alarms Fire alarms are required in all paper mills and fire alarm call points should be provided in all locations, according to international guidelines, such as NFPA 72 or EN54. The spread of flames and smoke in paper, wood and chemical storage might become extremely fast. For this reason, early detection is critical. Many technologies might be applied in the different areas of a paper plant. Nevertheless, there are dusty or humid areas where regular heat or smoke detectors might fail under certain circumstances. For these areas, especially located outdoors, innovative state-of-the-art detection solutions might be applied, like Video Fire Detection (VFD). NFPA 72 standard for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection NFPA 72 provides guidelines to implement this technology for flame and smoke detection, opening interesting alternatives for designers and fire protection engineers. Many EHS managers and fire protection professionals selected VFD, because it is the only fire detection solution that effectively covered their needs. Many engineers, specialized in fire protection for paper plants, explained that they tested linear heat detection, aspiration smoke detection, IR/UV detectors and even beams, but none of these technologies performed as they needed on the dirtiest or more humid areas. Video Fire Detection (VFD) solutions Outdoor storage areas are often unprotected, because deploying flame or heat detection in large open areas can be costly and mostly ineffective. VFD solutions can detect smoke and flames in outdoor conditions, allowing the monitoring and protection of wood and paper bales in large areas. Fire detection and alarm systems should be designed with the following goals: Minimize risk of fires, including the use of fire detection technology in areas where regular detection technologies cannot be implemented or are not practical. Minimize risk of flame and smoke spread, with state-of-the-art detection algorithms that guarantee fast and effective detection. Also, reliable algorithms minimize the possibility of nuance or unwanted alarms. In case of a fire, fast detection gives occupants life-saving time to reach to a place of safety, before the flames and smoke have spread to dangerous levels. Global production of paper and pulp reached 490 million tons in 2020, with many industries and markets depended on the paper and pulp supply chain. That is why innovative ways to protect this supply chain, are key to sustain the paper market growth in the future.

Maintaining Fire Safety Through A Pandemic
Maintaining Fire Safety Through A Pandemic

There have been challenges with completing fire safety maintenance and installation projects during the current Covid-19 crisis, most notably as a result of the difficulties for installers in safely accessing sites. Many construction projects halted for lockdown and this resulted in approximately 50% of the British installers we work with having to furlough staff. The challenges, however, are not just restricted to the UK. With Kentec panels sold in more than 90 countries across the world, we have seen varying challenges on a global scale. Throughout this crisis, fire safety continues to be paramount and as such key players, such as Kentec, are rightly considered essential businesses. We have continued manufacturing life safety systems throughout the current difficulties and it has been our mission to ensure that where new installations can take place, our panels are readily available to installers, as well as the expertise and technical support that goes with it for ongoing maintenance. Orders for spare parts have also, in fact, been consistently high during this period, as installers have been able to complete minor upgrades safely and end users have taken advantage of the period to do so. Adapting manufacturing processes to align with government guidelines so that customers have not experienced any supply issues with any life safety systems or parts has been a major success. Critical Infrastructure We’ve personally seen an increase in sales for our industry-leading Sigma XT extinguishant panels during this crisis as it is widely used within critical infrastructure, in sectors such as telecommunications, data centres and healthcare. Adapting manufacturing processes to align with government guidelines has been a major success During lockdown, with a vast proportion of the population working from home and relying on the internet to conduct their business and virtual meetings, it has been more important than ever that there is no loss in service in broadband and telephone services. This means that highly reliable and robust fire extinguishing systems are essential to protect essential workers and vital equipment – not only from the risk of fire, but also from the catastrophic damage that false alarms and the release of extinguishant could have, for example, on server room equipment. Understandably, this has resulted in considerable investment in fire systems in these sectors. Glasgow’s Louisa Jordan NHS Facility The recent fire safety installation at the Louisa Jordan NHS Facility Glasgow – located at the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) which provides more than 500 COVID-19 beds – is just one example of essential fire safety work being completed during lockdown. Vipond Fire Protection Ltd installed a total of seven Sigma XT gas suppression panels, and 32 detectors located within the electrical room that serves the 10,000m2 facility. The project was completed in what was an extremely tight seven-day turnaround, delivering proven reliability within a crucial healthcare facility. Kentec's Experience Operating Through Covid-19 We have learned that operating through this crisis and supporting installations that are going ahead is best achieved through detailed planning, communication and collaboration. For example, we’re supporting our distributors by shipping directly to their customers, when it is not safe or feasible to open their warehouses. Operating through this crisis is best achieved through detailed planning, communication and collaboration Our own workforce is also adapting to changing work patterns and demands. In the factory, at a practical level, this has meant implementing new shifts schedules starting from six o’clock in the morning to ten o’clock at night to ensure there are never too many people on site at one time. We have staggered arrival, leaving and break times to mitigate any risks involved at entrances, and we were lucky that space allowed us to make the canteen area bigger and increase the number of toilets from three to ten. We have moved work benches to ensure a safe distance between each employee, and where workflows make two-metre distancing impossible we have installed six- and eight-foot screens. Face masks have been provided to all staff and we are also trialling face shields for further comfort and protection. Our office staff have worked from home, and where going to the office has been necessary, they have similarly adhered to staggered arrival times. Internal communication has been essential and I’m immensely proud and extremely thankful for the positivity, proactivity and support that employees have shown through this process.     We have also adapted our Kentec Installation Partner (KIP) scheme to be fully remote to ensure training and support is there when it is needed for our installers. We are hosting webinars as another forum to solve installer queries remotely, and our new range of Taktis panels have highly advanced networking capabilities and a vast suite of communication tools that support remote monitoring. It is therefore critical that our installers fully understand how to help end users realise the benefits such panels can deliver and to ensure their installations are completed successfully. Looking Ahead To The New Normal Remote monitoring will become increasingly important beyond this crisis We feel that remote monitoring will become increasingly important beyond this crisis and the advanced communication capabilities of panels will be essential for both installers and end users alike. For installers it reduces the amount of time required on site, because they can access the system remotely to find out what equipment or parts they need to take with them. Similarly, for end users they can access systems remotely to check any alerts or queries off site if necessary. It remains to be seen how the rest of 2020 will pan out, but where projects have been necessarily put on hold, because of the essential nature of our industry we are confident that installers will be able to quickly and easily return to these projects when it is safe and feasible to do so. Communication, collaboration and support will continue to be essential in mitigating the challenges in our future ‘new normal.’

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Secutech Vietnam 10th Anniversary Witnessed Record-breaking Increase In Visitor Numbers
Secutech Vietnam 10th Anniversary Witnessed Record-breaking Increase In Visitor Numbers

At Secutech Vietnam 2017 there were 270 exhibitors from 20 countries and regions The 10th edition of Secutech Vietnam will be remembered for its record-breaking increase in visitor numbers. The show welcomed 12,097 global visitors (2016: 7,473) – up 62% on last year, as exhibitors seized the opportunities presented by one of the most promising security markets in Southeast Asia. 270 exhibitors from 20 countries Across 9,000 sqm of gross exhibition space, there were 270 exhibitors from 20 countries and regions: Australia, China, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Norway, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam, the UAE, the UK and the US. The likes of Bosch, Dahua, EN3, Everdigm, Force 21, GIGA, Hikvision, Himax, Honeywell, NAFFCO, Nittan, Questek, Rapidrop, Seagate, SFFECO, Synology, Techpro and Vantech were amongst the leading security and fire brands at the fair. In addition, three pavilions were in place during the course of the show. The Silversea Pavilion housed integrated and smart security solutions, while the UL Pavilion showcased fire safety systems and technologies. At the KFI Pavilion, a number of Korean companies exhibited their state-of-the-art product designs and innovations. Speaking of the results of this edition, Deputy General Manager of Messe Frankfurt New Era Business Media Ltd, Ms Regina Tsai, said: “The security market here in Vietnam is maturing, and shows a high demand for cross-sector technologies. Basic components cannot satisfy the market anymore. Therefore, as you can see, exhibitors have incorporated features for intelligent security solutions, smart buildings, smart city, home automation and fire safety and rescue opportunities in their products.” Across 9,000 sqm of gross exhibition space, there were 270 exhibitors from 20 countries and regions Advanced devices for end users Both newcomers and long-term exhibitors are aware of this market shift in Vietnam. Thus, they have introduced a plethora of advanced devices to end-users to the region. First-time exhibitor Boon Edam is a manufacturer of security entrances and revolving doors. The company’s Export Area Sales Manager, Mr Paul Liu, said: “With its surging economy, Vietnam is a rising market for the security industry with all kinds of opportunities. This is our first time exhibiting at Secutech Vietnam. It is amazing that the leading brands are all here at the show, which I believe is one of the reasons why there is a large flow of visitors.” Meanwhile, GES Co, an advanced security system provider, was delighted to meet target customers during the three-day show. Project leader of Overseas Business Division, Mr Hyun-il Ko, commented: “This is our first year exhibiting at Secutech Vietnam. We think the trade fair is well-organised in terms of visitor traffic and show arrangement. We’re excited to meet up with many distributors coming from commercial and government sectors. We’ll absolutely consider coming back next year.” Advanced technologies on display For some long-term exhibitors, Secutech Vietnam is a place to present their most advanced technologies. Drones and VR for security and rescue purposes as well as facial recognition management systems are some of the hot items. For instance, Vantech’s International Sales Manager, Mr Florian Le Guen, said: “This year, we’ve seen the highest traffic at the trade show than previous ones. Secutech Vietnam is an important business platform in Vietnam for security companies to show new products, and for visitors to see the future of technology.” Managing Director of Aventura, Mr Jack Cabasso, also commented: “Vietnam is the most significant emerging security market in the region and Secutech Vietnam fulfils the industry needs. We’ve seen a great amount of high quality attendees with current and upcoming security product requirements at the show this year.” The Global Digital Security Solutions Forum received positive feedback from both speakers and attendees Events and seminars What’s more, Secutech Vietnam offered more than just business opportunities to industry players. A series of concurrent events featuring leading security firms and associations aimed to disseminate insights and market trends. The Fire & Safety Seminar examined the most recent developments and applications of fire equipment. In addition, the Global Digital Security Solutions Forum, with the theme ‘Play Smart in Security – Applying Smart Solutions with Utmost Added Values’, received positive feedback from both speakers and attendees. The Asia Fire Protection Inspection Council General Meeting also concluded on a high note, with its exclusive 10 member countries discussing issues in their respective markets. There was also the Outdoor Demo Zone which displayed the latest fire equipment.  Secutech Vietnam 2018 Secutech Vietnam is supported by the Ministry of Public Security, the Ministry of National Defense, the Ministry of Science & Technology, the Ministry of Planning & Investment, the Ministry of Industry & Trade, the Ministry of Construction, and the Ministry of Transport. The next edition will be held 16-18 August 2018 at the Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center, Ho Chi Minh City.

Saudi Arabia Predicted To Become Second Largest Homeland Security Market By 2018
Saudi Arabia Predicted To Become Second Largest Homeland Security Market By 2018

Protex Arabia was launched in response to increased demands for fire services and alarm systems Saudi Arabia’s homeland security market is forecast to become the second largest in the world after the United States, with an expected worth of a massive US$97 billion in the next 7 years. This equates to a massive US$12 billion spend per year, highlighting very real business opportunities in this rapidly evolving market.As tensions increase in the security environment around the Middle East, authorities are now ramping up efforts to source the latest in counter measures and security systems to meet their increased needs. Security fences, thermal scanners, monitoring and surveillance systems, biometric readers and specialised arms and hazard control equipment are in high demand as measures are sought to protect pipelines, oil and industrial installations, as well as air and sea ports. Saudi Arabia supplies the majority of the world’s crude oil and 50% of its GDP being contributed by the oil and gas sector, the security of this sector alone is a very real risk to the Kingdom.The construction industry in Saudi Arabia, has also seen an increased awareness of the problems and enforcement of safety regulations, due to the number of major projects underway in Saudi Arabia, including the US$6 billion development of the Makkah-Madinah Railway, the expansion of King Abdulaziz International Airport and the development of Jeddah Islamic Seaport. These projects have lead to a boom in demand for safety training and equipment, fire services, detection and alarm systems. Protex Arabia gives firms with a serious interest in the fire markets the opportunity to meet with the key decision makers in the Kingdom In response to these market developments, the first international trade exhibition to focus on fire, safety and protection in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Protex Arabia 2011 was launched. The event took place at the Jeddah Centre for Forums and Events and has been inspired by the outstanding demand from both local and international market leaders such as Firex, NAFFCO, Harco, Bosch, SFFECO and Dupont, who have recognised the long-standing need for a platform of this sort in Saudi Arabia. The event, run jointly by two market leading organisers - The CWC Group and Al-Harithy Company for Exhibitions - focused on the three areas that are the fastest growing sectors and crucial to the Kingdom; commercial, IT and aviation security, homeland security & policing, fire and rescue and health and safety. Trade professionals could enter the exhibition for free by registering online, or alternatively on-site at the exhibition venue.Saudi Arabia has vast opportunities for international companies looking to expand their business in the region and internationally. “To win business in Saudi Arabia, companies must be present and showcase products and services in the Kingdom, meet the people, the agents, representatives and the customers who will affect decisions,” says The CWC Group’s Exhibitions Director, Rob Percival. “Protex Arabia gives all firms with a serious interest in the fire, safety and protection markets, the opportunity to meet with the key decision makers in the Kingdom and discuss and gather first-hand information about state-of-the-art technologies and services, whilst also networking with the biggest international companies of the industry,” he adds.The site of Protex Arabia 2011, the state-of-the-art Jeddah Centre for Forums and Events, is the Kingdom’s modern international exhibition centre tailor-made for big international trade shows.  The exhibition complex included an interactive demonstration area, allowing special outdoor demonstrations and live displays. Protex Arabia was the first opportunity in the Kingdom to view special demonstrations of the latest unmanned drone technology, thanks to leading Saudi systems integrator SecuTronic, as well as presentations from armoured Hummer manufactures, CCTV, the Police K9 unit and fire service. In addition to this, SFFECO hosted an awards ceremony for exhibitors awarded special contributions to the industry.  

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