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Fire Suppression Fluids And Gases, The Future Of Marine Fire Safety
Fire Suppression Fluids And Gases, The Future Of Marine Fire Safety

The original fire suppression agent has always been, of course, water. In the age of sail, it was ideal. Not so with the advent of the combustion engine, however. When applied to burning petroleum, the fire spreads. It also simply destroys electronics. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Halon derivatives were the first widely used commercial fire suppression solutions, gaining popularity in the 1950s and '60s. Unlike water, they were highly effective, electrically non-conductive and didn't leave any residue. As compressed gases, storage wasn't a major issue. Unfortunately, Halon was found to be a high ozone depleting chemical; as a result, production was banned in 1990. Evolution Of Fire Suppression Systems Ideal for marine applications, HFC227 is fast, effective and clean With the sunsetting of Halon and the search for alternatives, CO2 gained prominence. However, it has three significant drawbacks: it's a greenhouse gas, requires a large number of cylinders and is potentially fatal if breathed at design concentrations. In the 1990s, HFCs rose to dominance as a fire suppression solution. Ideal for marine applications, HFC227 is fast, effective and clean. Like Halon and CO2, however, it's a greenhouse gas and contributes to global warming. Discharging an average-sized cylinder of HFC227 has the same CO2 equivalent as driving a car 268,760 kilometers. This is why it is being eliminated as part of a phased-down mandate from the EU, and restricted or taxed by various countries such as Australia and Norway. It is expected that similar legislation will begin to affect Canada and US-flagged vessels. Environmental Profile Of HFCs In 2002, 3M introduced Novec™ 1230 Fire Protection Fluid. It offers a number of important advantages over other clean agents in marine fire suppression applications. It has low acute toxicity and high extinguishing efficiency. This gives it a wide margin of safety compared to other chemical clean agents such as HFC227. A fluid, it vaporizes rapidly during discharge, is non-corrosive, non-conductive and leaves no residue. It is, importantly, a long-term, sustainable solution with virtually zero global warming potential, e.g., it has an atmospheric life of about a week versus HFC227's 34 years. So confident is 3M of its product, it offers its BlueSkySM Warranty; if it is ever banned or restricted from use due to its environmental properties, the company will refund the cost of the fluid. Unlike CO2, a gas, Novec 1230 fluid can be flown to the vessel or platform allowing less downtime waiting for supplies to arrive by ground For the marine and offshore oil and gas industries, Novec 1230 fluid offers distinct advantages. Because it's a fluid, recharging is simple. Unlike CO2, a gas, it can be flown to the vessel or platform. This means less downtime waiting for supplies to arrive by ground. It also takes up significantly less space. Recently, Sea-Fire Europe ceased distribution of HFC227. The move was strategic and ethical, given the environmental profile of HFCs. Novec 1230 Fluid For Recreational Marine Market With the phase-down of HFCs, supplies are running out. This means in the immediate future there will be a serious inability to service systems. Also, with shortages beginning, costs are rising, making the switch to Novec 1230 fluid a smart move financially. While 3M will obviously benefit from this, the real winner here is our planet and the people we share it with" Sea-Fire recognizes that it may lose business in the short term as boat and shipbuilders continue to choose HFC-based fire systems strictly based on cost alone. But, ultimately, eliminating the use of hydrofluorocarbons is the right thing to do for the marine industry as a whole. As the first manufacturer to introduce Novec 1230 fluid into the recreational marine market in 2012, Sea-Fire is fully prepared for the phase-out of HFCs. Benefitting The Marine Industry "As a corporation, 3M is committed to improving every life," said David Olds, 3M account executive for fire suppression applications. "Sea-Fire Europe made a difficult decision when announcing it would cease distribution of HFC227. While 3M will obviously benefit from this, the real winner here is our planet and the people we share it with." Sea-Fire Marine has long held the belief that it is in the business of protecting people and property at sea. With its recent declaration that its master European distributor Sea-Fire Europe is ending distribution of HFC-based fire suppression fluids, it can add the environment to its list.

How Targeted Suppression Stops Fires At The Source
How Targeted Suppression Stops Fires At The Source

While whole room protection – sprinklers or gas systems – is a common choice, there is an argument for thinking smaller; taking fire detection and suppression down to the equipment, enclosures and even the components where a fire is most likely to start. Traditional Fire Suppression Methods A traditional water-based sprinkler system is the most common form of fire protection found in commercial and industrial buildings. They offer reasonable cost, large area protection for entire facilities, safeguarding the structure and personnel by limiting the spread and impact of a fire. Every square foot of the protected area is covered equally regardless of the contents of the space, whether it’s an empty floor or an object with an increased risk of fire. Sprinklers aren’t always the most appropriate choice. Not all fires are extinguished by water of course, and in some cases, water damage can be just as harmful or even more so than the fire. They are an impractical choice for instance for facilities housing anything electrical, such as data centres and server rooms. There is also the risk of accidental activation, with an estimated cost of up to $1,000 for every minute they are left running. Water damage can be just as harmful or even more so than any fire, so sprinklers may not be appropriate Targeted Supplementary Fire Suppression An alternative method to protect whole server rooms and data centres is gas fire suppression, which either suppresses the fire by displacing oxygen (inert) or by using a form of cooling mechanism (chemical/synthetic). These aren’t without risk; in the case of inert gas, oxygen is reduced to less than 15% to suffocate the fire, but must be kept above 12% to avoid endangering the lives of personnel. Similarly, clean agent gas can be toxic in high doses. There are smaller, focused systems that give the option of highly targeted supplementary fire suppression within fire risk areas. Installing a system directly into the areas most at risk, means that fires can be put out before they take hold and cause serious damage. Both sprinkler and gas systems can contain a fire, but micro-environment or closed space systems are completely automatic, detecting and suppressing the fire so rapidly that activating a sprinkler or gas total flooding system often isn’t necessary. The most popular enclosure fire suppression systems achieve this though the use of a flexible and durable polymer tubing that is routed easily through the tightest spaces. The tubing is extremely sensitive to heat and, because it can be placed so close to potential failure points, detects it and releases the fire suppression agent up to ten times faster than traditional systems. An airline was forced to cancel over 2,000 flights after a “small fire” in one of its data centers Cost-Effective Fire Protection Highly customizable, small enclosure fire suppression is specifically designed to protect business critical spaces and equipment. It is typically used inside machinery like CNC machines, mobile equipment like forklifts and inside server rooms and electrical cabinetry but is suitable for any hazard that’s considered to have an elevated fire risk. Some may question the need or cost-effectiveness of protecting micro-environments. However, examples abound of where fires that have started at component level have gone on to cause damage of the highest magnitude, and the cost of downtime can be crippling to many time-sensitive facilities and processes. An airline was forced to cancel over 2,000 flights in August 2016 when what was described as a “small fire” in one of its data centers ultimately led to a computer outage. The cost of that small fire, and the domino effect that quickly escalated from it, has since been announced as $150m. Admittedly that number is unusually high - the average cost of a data centre outage today is estimated at a more conservative $730,000 – but this is still an expense businesses can ill afford. Preventing Major Losses Staying with the transport industry, newer metros systems have redundant systems in place to prevent interruptions. However, older metro lines, such as the one in New York City, have experienced electrical fires that started small, but grew to such a magnitude that service was affected for months.Older metro lines, such as New York City's, have experience electrical fires that start small but grew exponentially A wind energy customer experienced a fire in a turbine converter cabinet. The loss of the cabinet was valued at over $200,000 and disabled the turbine for six weeks. Following investment in fire suppression systems inside the electrical cabinet, a subsequent fire was detected and suppressed before major damage could be caused. The cost on this occasion was therefore limited to a $25,000 component and downtime was less than two days.Equally - happily - there are also many instances where the installation of small enclosure fire suppression has prevented disaster. In the manufacturing world, CNC machines are valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars and need to be constantly operational to justify the investment. Oil coolant used in the machines can create a flash fire in an instant due to failed components or programming errors. The fact that many of these facilities are run ‘lights out’ with no personnel present further exacerbates the risk. If a fire is not dealt with immediately, the machine will be destroyed; sprinklers don’t react quickly enough for this scenario and would be ineffective. Ensuring Business Continuity One such flash fire occurred inside a protected CNC machine at a machine shop in Iowa. The polymer tubing ruptured within a fraction of a second, releasing the suppression agent and extinguishing the flames. The machine was undamaged and was operational again with a few hours. Contrast this to a previous fire at the same facility in an unprotected machine; it was out of operation for 4 days, costing the business thousands of dollars in downtime In short, fire protection is an essential element of our industrial and commercial environments to ensure both safety and business continuity. However, the nature of that protection is changing, as capacity increases to cost-effectively protect specific areas where fires are most likely to start. Risk mitigation analysis needs to look beyond what has been accepted in the past and find ways to further limit the impact of a small fire using this next level of protection. The benefits can really have a positive effect on the bottom line in the event of fire.

Latest VIKING Life - Saving Equipment A / S news

Viking Life-Saving Equipment Reports Increase In Demand For Shipowner Agreement Concept Post Drew Marine Fire Safety And Rescue Integration
Viking Life-Saving Equipment Reports Increase In Demand For Shipowner Agreement Concept Post Drew Marine Fire Safety And Rescue Integration

VIKING Life-Saving Equipment has reported a surge in demand for its one-stop shop Shipowner Agreement concept, following the integration of the Drew Marine Fire Safety and Rescue (FSR) division into its maritime safety solutions business. Having added all Drew Marine FSR marine firefighting equipment services (MFS) activities to its own credentials in life-saving appliances late 2019, VIKING is now a prominent supplier and service provider in the MFS segment. The Denmark based company employs over 100 specialist technicians who provide marine fire support in 47 countries, while its comprehensive portfolio covers all of the equipment and appliances needed for fighting shipboard fires. STCW training According to Helene Mønsted Andersen, Corporate Sales Manager, Owner Agreements, the acquisition is already paying dividends: “Our position in the marine fire segment is far stronger now that we have Drew Marine FSR on board. The company’s stellar reputation and extensive global network in the MFS market are making an appreciable difference just six months on from the takeover.” ”Since the integration of the two business entities, VIKING has been invited to bid on tenders for which it previously would not have been considered”, says Andersen, with several clients signing up for the full SOA citing the acquisition as their reason for doing so. “Now, when customers think of marine fire safety, they see VIKING as a center for excellence, as a global partner and as a complete service provider.” Foam solution As an example, William Gielen, Global Director of VIKING Marine Fire Service, highlights a recent business win in which a large global tanker operator opted for VIKING’s foam solution after becoming dissatisfied with the testing process for its existing system. “There is no doubt that the recent enhancement of our fire safety services played a crucial role in this contract,” he says. If VIKING’s new competencies in drydocking as well as medical oxygen supply and servicing have given the company a competitive edge, its overall offering is proving popular with former Drew Marine FSR clients, adds Gielen. “Knowing that they can rely on the same high-quality service that they have always enjoyed but with even more options, a number of Drew Marine clients have appointed VIKING to cover all of their safety needs,” he says. “Our Shipowner Agreement is more comprehensive than ever before, and this has been reflected in the positive response from customers both old and new.”

Viking Life-Saving Equipment Announces Deal For Aviation Suits In The British Sector North Sea
Viking Life-Saving Equipment Announces Deal For Aviation Suits In The British Sector North Sea

VIKING will work with Babcock Offshore to deliver aviation suits for Serica crew in the British sector of the North Sea. The contract marks VIKING’s second major success in the offshore aviation segment in as many years, following on from 2019 year’s agreement with CNOOC Petroleum Europe Limited, which also involved Babcock as aviation provider. STCW training Supplying offshore aircrews is an increasingly important focus for us, and we are quickly proving ourselves" Benny Carlsen, VIKING senior vice president of global sales and marketing, sees these supply and service agreements as a sign of things to come. “Supplying offshore aircrews is an increasingly important focus for us, and we are quickly proving ourselves in this fiercely competitive market,” he says. Carlsen believes there is a direct link between VIKING’s ongoing efforts to enhance its products and services and its impact in this specialized sector. Its latest aviation suit is one kilogram lighter than its predecessor, for example, and is fitted with a radio-frequency identification device (RFID) equipped to track its condition and detect any possible weak spots. Corporate social responsibility The use of RFIDs also cuts paper consumption significantly, improving operational efficiency while also benefiting the environment in a way that aligns closely with VIKING’s corporate social responsibility policy, says Heather McManus, VIKING global sales manager for aviation. “Serica Energy is strongly committed to minimizing its environmental impact, a commitment demonstrated in the fact that these suits feature reusable Velcro® straps instead of plastic packaging,” she adds. “Those working at sea are perhaps more conscious than anyone of the impact our throwaway culture has on the oceans. Cutting out single-use plastics isn’t just the right thing to do; it’s what our customers want to see.”

VIKING Safety Academy Offers E-Learning Solution For Training Delayed Due To COVID-19
VIKING Safety Academy Offers E-Learning Solution For Training Delayed Due To COVID-19

​​​VIKING Safety Academy has addressed a fast-emerging seafarer training issue brought by coronavirus by delivering a unique e-learning tool that can keep seafarers STCW compliant until restrictions on movement and social interactions come to an end. With many countries in lockdown, face to face seafarer training is also being suspended and some flag administrations have responded by granting automatic three-month extensions to the STCW Certificates seafarers must update every five years. However, VIKING Safety Academy has designed a unique training set-up so that seafarers can undergo training for a full certificate renewal even while the crisis persists. VIKING Safety Academy has worked with Estonia’s Reval Safety Training to offer STCW refresher training on an e-learning basis for Estonian seafarers. Personal Survival Techniques The training set-up includes: Personal Survival Techniques, Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting, Proficiency in Survival Craft and Rescue Boats, Fast Rescue Boats and Advanced Fire Fighting. “Seafarers can now use e-learning to train and renew certificates during these extraordinary times and maintain proof of competence,” says Camilla Runge Nissen, VIKING Safety Academy Product Manager, Training. "They can secure a longer six months extension and can make good use of the time getting ahead in the compliance process.” provisional STCW certificate Seafarers can visit a Reval Safety Training center during the six-month period for classroom/practical training Once the seafarer has completed the e-learning course, whether onboard or at home, he/she is given a provisional STCW certificate extension. Should conditions allow, seafarers can visit a Reval Safety Training center during the six-month period for classroom/practical training and secure a five-year Certificate of Proficiency, or complete once the crisis passes. While the STCW certificates extension based on e-learning is only available to Estonian residents for now, the course could easily be extended to other flag states, Nissen says. “All elements of the temporary package have been approved by the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA), we are already talking to other flag states and we can quickly roll this out.” digitally powered solutions The Norwegian Maritime Authority recently announced that it will allow seafarers onboard Norwegian vessels to join vessels until July 1st this year, even if they have only completed the theoretical relevant parts of STCW. “Under this guidance, e-learning is part of the picture, demonstrating that the set-up developed for Estonia can be very useful elsewhere.” Benny Carlsen, VIKING Senior Vice President, Global Sales and Marketing, adds that the new e-learning initiative aligns closely with group efforts to keep seafarers and owners compliant, safe, and as hassle and worry free as possible “free from stress”. “In extraordinary times, we need proactive and digitally-powered solutions to ensure that a training headache does not become a lasting issue.”

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